Zappos Insights http://www.zapposinsights.com/ Zappos Insights Wed, 07 Dec 2016 20:09:19 GMT How This Company in a City Became a City in a Company <p class="date"> 11/30/2016 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script type="text/javascript" src="//ws.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "cec80d9a-458b-434f-a39f-c0b9f446c13e", doNotHash: false, doNotCopy: false, hashAddressBar: false});</script> <div class="socialBar"> <span class='st_facebook_hcount' displayText='Facebook'></span> <span class='st_twitter_hcount' displayText='Tweet'></span> <span class='st_linkedin_hcount' displayText='LinkedIn'></span> <span class='st_googleplus_hcount' displayText='Google +'></span> </div><div class="summary"> <p> Running a company like a city is the premise upon which our CEO, Tony Hsieh, adopted the self-governing practice of Holacracy for Zappos in 2013.&nbsp;Research showed him that companies tend to become less productive and innovative over time as they increase in size.&nbsp;</p> </div> <div class="html clearfix clear"> <p> <img alt="" class="img-responsive img-thumbnail" src="http://www.zapposinsights.com/files/accounts/zappos/assets/images/content/blog-summary/welcome_to_dt.jpg" style="width: 425px; height: 248px; float: right; margin: 15px;" /></p> <p> According to the United States Geological Survey, there are 35,000 cities and towns that make up our country. The United States Census Bureau shows the number of towns or municipalities with fewer than 10,000 residents to be about 31,000, which means only the remaining 4,000 qualify as a true &ldquo;city&rdquo; as defined by population (being 25,000 or more people). It is determined that half the U.S. population resides in these 4,000 cities. That&rsquo;s a lot of people concentrated into a relatively small space, and yet cities seem to survive and thrive.</p> <p> Cities may close their factories, their steel mills, their major tourist attractions, or other entities that once helped them thrive; cities may do a lot of things wrong to cause profitability issues; Mother Nature may even take a devastating toll on an entire community. Even in these negative circumstances, we simply don&rsquo;t see, in today&rsquo;s society, an entire city just crumble and go away.&nbsp;</p> <p> Running a company like a city is the premise upon which our CEO, Tony Hsieh, adopted the self-governing practice of Holacracy for Zappos in 2013. Research showed him that companies tend to become less productive and innovative over time as they increase in size. He discovered that in contrast the majority of cities increase in productivity and innovation as they increase in size.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <strong>The experiment</strong></p> <p> The knowledge he gained in his research intrigued Tony enough for him to create a cross between a corporation, community and city when relocating Zappos from suburban Henderson, into the throes of urban density: downtown Las Vegas. This downtown campus would be directly connected to its surrounding community, keeping the company focus onsocial, environmental, and entrepreneurial responsibilities. More like a city, less like a bureaucratic corporation.</p> <p> Emulating a city makes our coworkers our neighbors, right?&nbsp; Like settlers crafting a new village, it goes without saying the success of the Zappos brand in this experimental corporate-community hybrid must rely on the effectiveness of our strong company culture.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <strong>Howdy, neighbor!</strong></p> <p> Live in any city long enough and you&rsquo;ll learn the benefits of harmony among a close knit group of neighbors. While it can take a lot of hard work to achieve that harmony, it&rsquo;s always worth the effort. With that in mind, I decided to take a virtual stroll through our &ldquo;neighborhood&rdquo; to see how our culture is helping our little city/community succeed in these early years of this transformation. Is our culture ensuring a positive and dynamic community for our customers, our vendors and each other? The way I see it, the easiest way to be certain that it does is to apply the &ldquo;unspoken&rdquo; rules of neighborly love.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <strong>Five rules to achieve and maintain neighborly love </strong></p> <p style="margin-left:.5in;"> <em>1)&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </em><em>Do unto your neighbor as you would have your neighbor do unto you. </em></p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> You can certainly tell when it&rsquo;s someone&rsquo;s birthday or work anniversary here in our community by the heaps of confetti surrounding their work stations. Actually, balloons, cards, gifts and gadgets galore can grace anyone for a plethora of reasons around here. You name it, when it comes to celebrating and honoring our neighbors, we believe it is top of the list of important things to do. In fact, we have a whole team of people whose roles are focused on putting a smile on the face of their fellow neighbors.</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> Each and every day, whether in the Call Center on in Merchandising, we deliver stellar service to customers and vendors, keeping Zappos at the top of the ratings of esteemed U.S. companies. Therefore, it only makes sense to offer that same great service to one another, allowing our gratitude to replenish our spirit of giving.</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> We can grant a helpful neighbor a $50 bonus that appears on their paycheck compliments of Zappos. Once a month, a Zappos Hero is selected, an award that comes with an assigned parking space and gift certificate. These are two of the many ways we can do unto our neighbor, as we would have them do unto us.</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin-left:.5in;"> <em>2)&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </em><em>Don&rsquo;t look at the splinter in your neighbor&rsquo;s eye when you have a plank in your own eye. </em></p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> Using this biblical parallel, it&rsquo;s easy to imagine the number of challenges that may arise in an environment where everyone is encouraged to bring their own entrepreneurial energy and passions to the table. Leaders and team members alike may not agree on the methods through which tasks are accomplished, or even what tasks are necessary for that matter. What then?</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> Offering conflict management courses on a regular basis is a way we allow our neighbors to learn how to approach each other in a diplomatic and respectful manner. Because at the end of the day, it&rsquo;s not about who&rsquo;s right and who&rsquo;s wrong. It&rsquo;s about valuing each other&rsquo;s contributions to the main vision by developing a conscious awareness of how our actions may affect others.</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> To take matters a step further, if there&rsquo;s a Hatfield and McCoy situation brewing, both parties can request a private meeting with a qualified mediator to help coach them to a resolution. There are many other resources at our fingertips to help us stay aligned with our core values of <em>build open and honest relationships with communication</em>, <em>build a</em> <em>positive team and family spirit</em>, and <em>create fun and a little weirdness</em>, just to name a few. &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin-left:.5in;"> <em>3)&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </em><em>The grass is <u>not</u> always greener, so don&rsquo;t hate. &nbsp;</em></p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> Have you ever envied your neighbor&rsquo;s new car in their driveway? Do you find yourself lamenting over your flowerbed full of brown weeds, while your neighbor&rsquo;s is vibrant and colorful? &nbsp;Who hasn&rsquo;t envisioned someone else&rsquo;s job, or even life, as better than their own?</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> Not only is this unhealthy to your psyche, but it&rsquo;s also totally unnecessary here in our neighborhood. Why? Because we encourage &ldquo;shadowing&rdquo; with neighbors on any given day so you can see just what it is others do in their roles within the company. This presents an excellent opportunity for many reasons.</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> Perhaps you thought someone&rsquo;s role was all glitz and glamour until you sat with them for several hours and really saw firsthand the hard work required of them. Shadowing not only gives you insight into a role you may also like to hold, but you also get to see the bigger picture in how all our roles come together for the greater purpose of fulfilling our company&rsquo;s vision of wowing customers. &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> So, here, when it comes to sharing close space with neighbors who may all be doing such different activities, we don&rsquo;t have to hate; we investigate.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin-left:.5in;"> <em>4)&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </em><em>Make it a point to learn who your neighbors are.</em></p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> &ldquo;There are companies that focus on work-life separation or work-life balance,&rdquo; says Tony. &ldquo;At Zappos, we really focus on work-life integration and at the end of the day it&rsquo;s just life&hellip;..and especially if you spend so much time at work, you better enjoy the time you&rsquo;re spending there and the people that you&rsquo;re with&hellip;.&rdquo;</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> Never have those words been truer than when it comes to our Zappos community. Strolling across campus you see neighbors playing games such as miniature golf, ping pong, and foosball. They&rsquo;re enjoying lunch at the Bistro with their entire team, instead of using their lunch hour as an opportunity to eagerly rush away from those people. Impromptu happy hours or planned team-building activities offsite at bowling alleys, restaurants, hiking trails and other fun places are a regular occurrence many look forward to.&nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin-left:.5in;"> <em>5)&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </em><em>Keep your pets in your own yard. </em></p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> A sure-fire way to get on your neighbor&rsquo;s last nerve is to let your dog stray freely into their yard, digging up their flower garden or leaving &ldquo;evidence&rdquo; in their grass. I&rsquo;m sure we all know proper pet etiquette, so I&rsquo;m preaching to the choir here.</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> What we have in our Zappos community is rather unique compared to other companies&mdash;especially those of our size. Upon passing extensive testing, dogs are registered to accompany their pet parents to work on a regular basis. They hang out at desk-side, they sit on laps in meetings and they are walked to the grassy area on campus to stretch their legs. They&rsquo;re definitely ogled over and petted everywhere they go.</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> There&rsquo;s 6-year-old Max, a Golden Retriever, who&rsquo;s in the process of being trained to become a 100% service animal. In the meantime, he&rsquo;s successfully passed the necessary testing we require to hang out here with us. Shifu is a Chihuahua and is also 6 years old. This tiny service animal has the luxury of being carried around in his pet parent&rsquo;s large &ldquo;pet purse.&rdquo; Duke is huge but as gentle as can be. He is a male Great Dane and is almost 5 years old.</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> The dogs&rsquo; presence is handled very diplomatically by Zappos, with best practices established for the pet parents and &ldquo;no pet zones&rdquo; designated to respect those workers with pet allergies. All in all, there are no known neighbor wars due to pet offenses. Could babies on board be next? &nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <strong>A great city begins with great people</strong></p> <p> Well, it looks like our culture <em>is</em> helping to pave the way to a successful city-run company experience. Even so, like any community, there&rsquo;ll always be hurdles in the system to overcome. Great neighbors&mdash;like the ones we have here at Zappos&mdash;working together is the key to keeping any community going strong. I believe if we all buy into Tony&rsquo;s city vision, we&rsquo;ll continue to be the best of neighbors for years to come. Now, for Pete&rsquo;s sake, whoever borrowed my hedge clippers, please return them!&nbsp;</p> <div class="col-md-12" style="background-color: #F5F5F5; color: #222; padding: 25px; border: 1px solid #DBDCDE "> <form accept-charset="UTF-8" action="https://zapposinsights.infusionsoft.com/app/form/process/ad6da8b221a3abfd415c968f6f58bafb" class="infusion-form" method="POST"> <input name="inf_form_xid" type="hidden" value="ad6da8b221a3abfd415c968f6f58bafb" /> <input name="inf_form_name" type="hidden" value="Sign up for newsletter" /> <input name="infusionsoft_version" type="hidden" value="1.41.0.42" /> <div class="infusion-field col-md-5"> <input class="infusion-field-input-container form-control" id="inf_field_FirstName" name="inf_field_FirstName" placeholder="First Name" type="text" /></div> <div class="infusion-field col-md-5"> <input class="infusion-field-input-container form-control" id="inf_field_Email" name="inf_field_Email" placeholder="Email Address" type="text" /></div> <div class="infusion-submit col-md-2"> <input class="btn btn-success" type="submit" value="Submit" /></div> </form> <script type="text/javascript" src="https://zapposinsights.infusionsoft.com/app/webTracking/getTrackingCode?trackingId=e8b2378adcd750ec577b846046b8164d"></script></div> </div> <p class="date"> 11/30/2016 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script type="text/javascript" src="//ws.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "cec80d9a-458b-434f-a39f-c0b9f446c13e", doNotHash: false, doNotCopy: false, hashAddressBar: false});</script> <div class="socialBar"> <span class='st_facebook_hcount' displayText='Facebook'></span> <span class='st_twitter_hcount' displayText='Tweet'></span> <span class='st_linkedin_hcount' displayText='LinkedIn'></span> <span class='st_googleplus_hcount' displayText='Google +'></span> </div><div class="summary"> <p> Running a company like a city is the premise upon which our CEO, Tony Hsieh, adopted the self-governing practice of Holacracy for Zappos in 2013.&nbsp;Research showed him that companies tend to become less productive and innovative over time as they increase in size.&nbsp;</p> </div> <div class="html clearfix clear"> <p> <img alt="" class="img-responsive img-thumbnail" src="http://www.zapposinsights.com/files/accounts/zappos/assets/images/content/blog-summary/welcome_to_dt.jpg" style="width: 425px; height: 248px; float: right; margin: 15px;" /></p> <p> According to the United States Geological Survey, there are 35,000 cities and towns that make up our country. The United States Census Bureau shows the number of towns or municipalities with fewer than 10,000 residents to be about 31,000, which means only the remaining 4,000 qualify as a true &ldquo;city&rdquo; as defined by population (being 25,000 or more people). It is determined that half the U.S. population resides in these 4,000 cities. That&rsquo;s a lot of people concentrated into a relatively small space, and yet cities seem to survive and thrive.</p> <p> Cities may close their factories, their steel mills, their major tourist attractions, or other entities that once helped them thrive; cities may do a lot of things wrong to cause profitability issues; Mother Nature may even take a devastating toll on an entire community. Even in these negative circumstances, we simply don&rsquo;t see, in today&rsquo;s society, an entire city just crumble and go away.&nbsp;</p> <p> Running a company like a city is the premise upon which our CEO, Tony Hsieh, adopted the self-governing practice of Holacracy for Zappos in 2013. Research showed him that companies tend to become less productive and innovative over time as they increase in size. He discovered that in contrast the majority of cities increase in productivity and innovation as they increase in size.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <strong>The experiment</strong></p> <p> The knowledge he gained in his research intrigued Tony enough for him to create a cross between a corporation, community and city when relocating Zappos from suburban Henderson, into the throes of urban density: downtown Las Vegas. This downtown campus would be directly connected to its surrounding community, keeping the company focus onsocial, environmental, and entrepreneurial responsibilities. More like a city, less like a bureaucratic corporation.</p> <p> Emulating a city makes our coworkers our neighbors, right?&nbsp; Like settlers crafting a new village, it goes without saying the success of the Zappos brand in this experimental corporate-community hybrid must rely on the effectiveness of our strong company culture.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <strong>Howdy, neighbor!</strong></p> <p> Live in any city long enough and you&rsquo;ll learn the benefits of harmony among a close knit group of neighbors. While it can take a lot of hard work to achieve that harmony, it&rsquo;s always worth the effort. With that in mind, I decided to take a virtual stroll through our &ldquo;neighborhood&rdquo; to see how our culture is helping our little city/community succeed in these early years of this transformation. Is our culture ensuring a positive and dynamic community for our customers, our vendors and each other? The way I see it, the easiest way to be certain that it does is to apply the &ldquo;unspoken&rdquo; rules of neighborly love.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <strong>Five rules to achieve and maintain neighborly love </strong></p> <p style="margin-left:.5in;"> <em>1)&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </em><em>Do unto your neighbor as you would have your neighbor do unto you. </em></p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> You can certainly tell when it&rsquo;s someone&rsquo;s birthday or work anniversary here in our community by the heaps of confetti surrounding their work stations. Actually, balloons, cards, gifts and gadgets galore can grace anyone for a plethora of reasons around here. You name it, when it comes to celebrating and honoring our neighbors, we believe it is top of the list of important things to do. In fact, we have a whole team of people whose roles are focused on putting a smile on the face of their fellow neighbors.</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> Each and every day, whether in the Call Center on in Merchandising, we deliver stellar service to customers and vendors, keeping Zappos at the top of the ratings of esteemed U.S. companies. Therefore, it only makes sense to offer that same great service to one another, allowing our gratitude to replenish our spirit of giving.</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> We can grant a helpful neighbor a $50 bonus that appears on their paycheck compliments of Zappos. Once a month, a Zappos Hero is selected, an award that comes with an assigned parking space and gift certificate. These are two of the many ways we can do unto our neighbor, as we would have them do unto us.</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin-left:.5in;"> <em>2)&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </em><em>Don&rsquo;t look at the splinter in your neighbor&rsquo;s eye when you have a plank in your own eye. </em></p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> Using this biblical parallel, it&rsquo;s easy to imagine the number of challenges that may arise in an environment where everyone is encouraged to bring their own entrepreneurial energy and passions to the table. Leaders and team members alike may not agree on the methods through which tasks are accomplished, or even what tasks are necessary for that matter. What then?</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> Offering conflict management courses on a regular basis is a way we allow our neighbors to learn how to approach each other in a diplomatic and respectful manner. Because at the end of the day, it&rsquo;s not about who&rsquo;s right and who&rsquo;s wrong. It&rsquo;s about valuing each other&rsquo;s contributions to the main vision by developing a conscious awareness of how our actions may affect others.</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> To take matters a step further, if there&rsquo;s a Hatfield and McCoy situation brewing, both parties can request a private meeting with a qualified mediator to help coach them to a resolution. There are many other resources at our fingertips to help us stay aligned with our core values of <em>build open and honest relationships with communication</em>, <em>build a</em> <em>positive team and family spirit</em>, and <em>create fun and a little weirdness</em>, just to name a few. &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin-left:.5in;"> <em>3)&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </em><em>The grass is <u>not</u> always greener, so don&rsquo;t hate. &nbsp;</em></p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> Have you ever envied your neighbor&rsquo;s new car in their driveway? Do you find yourself lamenting over your flowerbed full of brown weeds, while your neighbor&rsquo;s is vibrant and colorful? &nbsp;Who hasn&rsquo;t envisioned someone else&rsquo;s job, or even life, as better than their own?</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> Not only is this unhealthy to your psyche, but it&rsquo;s also totally unnecessary here in our neighborhood. Why? Because we encourage &ldquo;shadowing&rdquo; with neighbors on any given day so you can see just what it is others do in their roles within the company. This presents an excellent opportunity for many reasons.</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> Perhaps you thought someone&rsquo;s role was all glitz and glamour until you sat with them for several hours and really saw firsthand the hard work required of them. Shadowing not only gives you insight into a role you may also like to hold, but you also get to see the bigger picture in how all our roles come together for the greater purpose of fulfilling our company&rsquo;s vision of wowing customers. &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> So, here, when it comes to sharing close space with neighbors who may all be doing such different activities, we don&rsquo;t have to hate; we investigate.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin-left:.5in;"> <em>4)&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </em><em>Make it a point to learn who your neighbors are.</em></p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> &ldquo;There are companies that focus on work-life separation or work-life balance,&rdquo; says Tony. &ldquo;At Zappos, we really focus on work-life integration and at the end of the day it&rsquo;s just life&hellip;..and especially if you spend so much time at work, you better enjoy the time you&rsquo;re spending there and the people that you&rsquo;re with&hellip;.&rdquo;</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> Never have those words been truer than when it comes to our Zappos community. Strolling across campus you see neighbors playing games such as miniature golf, ping pong, and foosball. They&rsquo;re enjoying lunch at the Bistro with their entire team, instead of using their lunch hour as an opportunity to eagerly rush away from those people. Impromptu happy hours or planned team-building activities offsite at bowling alleys, restaurants, hiking trails and other fun places are a regular occurrence many look forward to.&nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin-left:.5in;"> <em>5)&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </em><em>Keep your pets in your own yard. </em></p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> A sure-fire way to get on your neighbor&rsquo;s last nerve is to let your dog stray freely into their yard, digging up their flower garden or leaving &ldquo;evidence&rdquo; in their grass. I&rsquo;m sure we all know proper pet etiquette, so I&rsquo;m preaching to the choir here.</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> What we have in our Zappos community is rather unique compared to other companies&mdash;especially those of our size. Upon passing extensive testing, dogs are registered to accompany their pet parents to work on a regular basis. They hang out at desk-side, they sit on laps in meetings and they are walked to the grassy area on campus to stretch their legs. They&rsquo;re definitely ogled over and petted everywhere they go.</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> There&rsquo;s 6-year-old Max, a Golden Retriever, who&rsquo;s in the process of being trained to become a 100% service animal. In the meantime, he&rsquo;s successfully passed the necessary testing we require to hang out here with us. Shifu is a Chihuahua and is also 6 years old. This tiny service animal has the luxury of being carried around in his pet parent&rsquo;s large &ldquo;pet purse.&rdquo; Duke is huge but as gentle as can be. He is a male Great Dane and is almost 5 years old.</p> <p style="margin-left:.25in;"> The dogs&rsquo; presence is handled very diplomatically by Zappos, with best practices established for the pet parents and &ldquo;no pet zones&rdquo; designated to respect those workers with pet allergies. All in all, there are no known neighbor wars due to pet offenses. Could babies on board be next? &nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <strong>A great city begins with great people</strong></p> <p> Well, it looks like our culture <em>is</em> helping to pave the way to a successful city-run company experience. Even so, like any community, there&rsquo;ll always be hurdles in the system to overcome. Great neighbors&mdash;like the ones we have here at Zappos&mdash;working together is the key to keeping any community going strong. I believe if we all buy into Tony&rsquo;s city vision, we&rsquo;ll continue to be the best of neighbors for years to come. Now, for Pete&rsquo;s sake, whoever borrowed my hedge clippers, please return them!&nbsp;</p> <div class="col-md-12" style="background-color: #F5F5F5; color: #222; padding: 25px; border: 1px solid #DBDCDE "> <form accept-charset="UTF-8" action="https://zapposinsights.infusionsoft.com/app/form/process/ad6da8b221a3abfd415c968f6f58bafb" class="infusion-form" method="POST"> <input name="inf_form_xid" type="hidden" value="ad6da8b221a3abfd415c968f6f58bafb" /> <input name="inf_form_name" type="hidden" value="Sign up for newsletter" /> <input name="infusionsoft_version" type="hidden" value="1.41.0.42" /> <div class="infusion-field col-md-5"> <input class="infusion-field-input-container form-control" id="inf_field_FirstName" name="inf_field_FirstName" placeholder="First Name" type="text" /></div> <div class="infusion-field col-md-5"> <input class="infusion-field-input-container form-control" id="inf_field_Email" name="inf_field_Email" placeholder="Email Address" type="text" /></div> <div class="infusion-submit col-md-2"> <input class="btn btn-success" type="submit" value="Submit" /></div> </form> <script type="text/javascript" src="https://zapposinsights.infusionsoft.com/app/webTracking/getTrackingCode?trackingId=e8b2378adcd750ec577b846046b8164d"></script></div> </div> http://www.zapposinsights.com/blog/item/how-this-company-in-a-city-became-a-city-in-a-company http://www.zapposinsights.com/blog/item/how-this-company-in-a-city-became-a-city-in-a-company Wed, 30 Nov 2016 05:00:00 GMT Let’s talk about the “F” word <p class="date"> 10/20/2016 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script type="text/javascript" src="//ws.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "cec80d9a-458b-434f-a39f-c0b9f446c13e", doNotHash: false, doNotCopy: false, hashAddressBar: false});</script> <div class="socialBar"> <span class='st_facebook_hcount' displayText='Facebook'></span> <span class='st_twitter_hcount' displayText='Tweet'></span> <span class='st_linkedin_hcount' displayText='LinkedIn'></span> <span class='st_googleplus_hcount' displayText='Google +'></span> </div><div class="summary"> <p> That four letter F word. You know the one. It elicits fear and can make even the most unabashed of us cringe.</p> </div> <div class="html clearfix clear"> <p> <img alt="" class="img-responsive img-thumbnail" src="http://www.zapposinsights.com/files/accounts/zappos/assets/images/content/blog-summary/failure.png" style="width: 350px; height: 171px; float: right; margin: 10px;" />Fail.</p> <p> Failure.</p> <p> Failing.</p> <p> What is it about this word that gets the best of us?</p> <p> In my almost 7 year journey here at Zappos, I can safely say that I have failed. Numerous times. Sometimes publicly. Sometimes alone, with only myself to bear witness to that feeling of shame, regret, and wondering if I was the only person in the history of Zappos-dom (if that&rsquo;s not already a thing, it should be&hellip;Zappos-dom, all things Zappos. You read it here first). Of course, I&rsquo;ve had plenty of moments where I&rsquo;ve truly felt like I could conquer the world, but those failures still hang over me. Even at my best, the possibility of failing and failing hard is something that, for me, can be hard to shake.</p> <p> So what is it about failure that keeps us from reaching our full potential?I believe it&rsquo;s when we don&rsquo;t take the time to revel in it. Think about the last time you celebrated a win, whether for your self or for your circle. Now take time to think about the last time you celebrated failure. It&rsquo;s ok, I&rsquo;ll wait.</p> <p> In my experience, we tend to sweep these failures under the rug, hiding them before we quickly move on and never speak of said failure again. It&rsquo;s like that black sheep family member that you know is there but you pretend doesn&rsquo;t exist until you&rsquo;re face to face with them at Thanksgiving dinner. Or in failure&rsquo;s case, when you&rsquo;re faced with the consequences. I&rsquo;ll never forget my New Hiring Training experience. I caught on to most of the concepts pretty quickly, but still the thought of navigating a new system while engaging with customers seemed a bit nerve wracking. What if I messed it up? What if I broke the website? The answer to that and many of my class&rsquo; worst-case scenario questions were met with a now familiar, Zappos-esque response of, &ldquo;there&rsquo;s nothing you can mess up, that we can&rsquo;t fix.&rdquo; It&rsquo;s something I often repeated in my Leadership journey to brand new team members hoping to reassure them that everything would be ok. If they failed, we&rsquo;d be there to help make it right. Deep down, it&rsquo;s just something I never believed for myself. I couldn&rsquo;t fail. I couldn&rsquo;t let people down. I wouldn&rsquo;t.</p> <p> That fear, kept me from truly taking risks for the better part of my time here at Zappos. I knew what I was good at and stuck with it. A comfort zone is damn comfortable for a reason.</p> <p> Fast forward to today. In the past year, I&rsquo;ve taken numerous risks. Some without much success. I&rsquo;ve joined circles with little to no experience. Spoke on stage at an All Hands (my biggest fear!). I&rsquo;ve been removed from roles. I&rsquo;ve received tough feedback. I&rsquo;ve &ldquo;failed&rdquo; more times than I&rsquo;m even comfortable admitting. You know what? The growth I&rsquo;ve experienced through these failures has been incredible. I&rsquo;ve done my share of what I call &ldquo;movie reeling&rdquo;. You know where you mentally replay every stupid thing you&rsquo;ve ever said or done and play it in your head over and over until you want to quit your job, sell your house, and move to another country to get a fresh start? Oh wait, maybe that&rsquo;s just me. Although that may sound a little extreme, through those replays I&rsquo;ve been able to break down the reasons for my failures, how to pick up the pieces, and move on. More importantly, I&rsquo;ve been able to discover strengths I didn&rsquo;t know I had and have learned what works and what doesn&rsquo;t.</p> <p> As a company, we can easily think of a dozen things that have gone wrong or &ldquo;failed&rdquo;. Bringing up these things is usually met with a laugh and some reminiscence while we quickly change the subject. What if instead, we look fondly at these lows and really reflect on what those experiences taught us? As a company and as people. Can we reflect on these publicly and admit where we went wrong? In the spirit of transparency, let&rsquo;s share these moments and make them teachable, outlining what went wrong, what the impact was, and what we&rsquo;ve learned for the next time a situation like that arises.</p> <p> My name is Melissa and I&rsquo;m a failure. I challenge you to do the same and share your story.</p> </div> <p class="date"> 10/20/2016 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script type="text/javascript" src="//ws.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "cec80d9a-458b-434f-a39f-c0b9f446c13e", doNotHash: false, doNotCopy: false, hashAddressBar: false});</script> <div class="socialBar"> <span class='st_facebook_hcount' displayText='Facebook'></span> <span class='st_twitter_hcount' displayText='Tweet'></span> <span class='st_linkedin_hcount' displayText='LinkedIn'></span> <span class='st_googleplus_hcount' displayText='Google +'></span> </div><div class="summary"> <p> That four letter F word. You know the one. It elicits fear and can make even the most unabashed of us cringe.</p> </div> <div class="html clearfix clear"> <p> <img alt="" class="img-responsive img-thumbnail" src="http://www.zapposinsights.com/files/accounts/zappos/assets/images/content/blog-summary/failure.png" style="width: 350px; height: 171px; float: right; margin: 10px;" />Fail.</p> <p> Failure.</p> <p> Failing.</p> <p> What is it about this word that gets the best of us?</p> <p> In my almost 7 year journey here at Zappos, I can safely say that I have failed. Numerous times. Sometimes publicly. Sometimes alone, with only myself to bear witness to that feeling of shame, regret, and wondering if I was the only person in the history of Zappos-dom (if that&rsquo;s not already a thing, it should be&hellip;Zappos-dom, all things Zappos. You read it here first). Of course, I&rsquo;ve had plenty of moments where I&rsquo;ve truly felt like I could conquer the world, but those failures still hang over me. Even at my best, the possibility of failing and failing hard is something that, for me, can be hard to shake.</p> <p> So what is it about failure that keeps us from reaching our full potential?I believe it&rsquo;s when we don&rsquo;t take the time to revel in it. Think about the last time you celebrated a win, whether for your self or for your circle. Now take time to think about the last time you celebrated failure. It&rsquo;s ok, I&rsquo;ll wait.</p> <p> In my experience, we tend to sweep these failures under the rug, hiding them before we quickly move on and never speak of said failure again. It&rsquo;s like that black sheep family member that you know is there but you pretend doesn&rsquo;t exist until you&rsquo;re face to face with them at Thanksgiving dinner. Or in failure&rsquo;s case, when you&rsquo;re faced with the consequences. I&rsquo;ll never forget my New Hiring Training experience. I caught on to most of the concepts pretty quickly, but still the thought of navigating a new system while engaging with customers seemed a bit nerve wracking. What if I messed it up? What if I broke the website? The answer to that and many of my class&rsquo; worst-case scenario questions were met with a now familiar, Zappos-esque response of, &ldquo;there&rsquo;s nothing you can mess up, that we can&rsquo;t fix.&rdquo; It&rsquo;s something I often repeated in my Leadership journey to brand new team members hoping to reassure them that everything would be ok. If they failed, we&rsquo;d be there to help make it right. Deep down, it&rsquo;s just something I never believed for myself. I couldn&rsquo;t fail. I couldn&rsquo;t let people down. I wouldn&rsquo;t.</p> <p> That fear, kept me from truly taking risks for the better part of my time here at Zappos. I knew what I was good at and stuck with it. A comfort zone is damn comfortable for a reason.</p> <p> Fast forward to today. In the past year, I&rsquo;ve taken numerous risks. Some without much success. I&rsquo;ve joined circles with little to no experience. Spoke on stage at an All Hands (my biggest fear!). I&rsquo;ve been removed from roles. I&rsquo;ve received tough feedback. I&rsquo;ve &ldquo;failed&rdquo; more times than I&rsquo;m even comfortable admitting. You know what? The growth I&rsquo;ve experienced through these failures has been incredible. I&rsquo;ve done my share of what I call &ldquo;movie reeling&rdquo;. You know where you mentally replay every stupid thing you&rsquo;ve ever said or done and play it in your head over and over until you want to quit your job, sell your house, and move to another country to get a fresh start? Oh wait, maybe that&rsquo;s just me. Although that may sound a little extreme, through those replays I&rsquo;ve been able to break down the reasons for my failures, how to pick up the pieces, and move on. More importantly, I&rsquo;ve been able to discover strengths I didn&rsquo;t know I had and have learned what works and what doesn&rsquo;t.</p> <p> As a company, we can easily think of a dozen things that have gone wrong or &ldquo;failed&rdquo;. Bringing up these things is usually met with a laugh and some reminiscence while we quickly change the subject. What if instead, we look fondly at these lows and really reflect on what those experiences taught us? As a company and as people. Can we reflect on these publicly and admit where we went wrong? In the spirit of transparency, let&rsquo;s share these moments and make them teachable, outlining what went wrong, what the impact was, and what we&rsquo;ve learned for the next time a situation like that arises.</p> <p> My name is Melissa and I&rsquo;m a failure. I challenge you to do the same and share your story.</p> </div> http://www.zapposinsights.com/blog/item/lets-talk-about-the-f-word http://www.zapposinsights.com/blog/item/lets-talk-about-the-f-word Thu, 20 Oct 2016 22:03:12 GMT Open Space Works for Zappos <p class="date"> 10/12/2016 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script type="text/javascript" src="//ws.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "cec80d9a-458b-434f-a39f-c0b9f446c13e", doNotHash: false, doNotCopy: false, hashAddressBar: false});</script> <div class="socialBar"> <span class='st_facebook_hcount' displayText='Facebook'></span> <span class='st_twitter_hcount' displayText='Tweet'></span> <span class='st_linkedin_hcount' displayText='LinkedIn'></span> <span class='st_googleplus_hcount' displayText='Google +'></span> </div><div class="summary"> <p> Open Space meeting: a purpose-driven meeting framework. It has stood the test of time&mdash;30 years and counting, as a matter of fact. Yet, how much do you know about it?</p> </div> <div class="html clearfix clear"> <p> I&rsquo;ve asked several people about Open Space, and at best, they could guess what it meant simply by the name. However, none had any accurate knowledge of this concept with regards to its approach to meetings, conferences, corporate retreats, symposiums, and similar events. I had no knowledge of it either, until recently, when I experienced an Open Space process firsthand. I am so impressed by its value that I am compelled to share about it.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p align="center"> <strong>Open Space&rsquo;s beginnings</strong></p> <p> Open Space seems to have appeared on the global scene in the mid 1980&rsquo;s, when Harrison Owen grew weary of organizing and hosting annual traditional conferences centered around his white paper on Organization Transformation. In a third year planning session, the idea came to him to conduct the conference in an open, unstructured style. Feedback from previous events indicated that people enjoyed the coffee breaks most. From that, he made a conscious effort to focus most on what works in the meetings.</p> <p> Owen&rsquo;s invitation, as well as his opening statement for that year&rsquo;s conference, informed the attendees the format would be open and they would self-organize around the issues essential to their purpose for being there. His plan also allowed the grunt work normally performed by leadership (basically just him in those early years) to be distributed and assigned to his participants. Everyone became responsible for maximizing their own productivity and learning capacity.</p> <p> Many of Owen&rsquo;s basic ideas for this framework were taken from his experience as a biblical scholar, pastor, Peace Corps organizer in the villages of West Africa, federal government staffer and organization development consultant in Washington DC. He also took ideas from Native American tradition and those of the East, as well as various group dynamics wherever he traveled.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p align="center"> <strong>Open Space&rsquo;s Effectiveness</strong></p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> Twenty-five years later, Owen&rsquo;s conferences were continuing with over 100,000 different Open Space meetings held in corporations in over 160 countries; representing 21 different languages. Proof of the format&rsquo;s effectiveness. Its participants have described the method as: &ldquo;spirit at work,&rdquo; &ldquo;passion bounded by responsibility,&rdquo; &ldquo;intentional self-organization,&rdquo; &ldquo;chaos and creativity,&rdquo; and &ldquo;evolution in organization.&rdquo;</p> <p> In its typical setting, issues of importance or conflicts are posted on a community bulletin board, sometimes referred to as the Marketplace Wall. As each issue is worked through, additional notes and products (i.e. an aggregated report, or list of takeaways identified at the end) get posted based on everyone&rsquo;s contributions. It&rsquo;s a simple way to foster productivity, whether there are five people or five thousand in attendance.</p> <p> If at all possible, plenty of markers, papers, tape, chairs, whiteboards, and flipcharts should be on hand for the meeting. If these items aren&rsquo;t available, a space and a time is all that is really needed; this format can even be successfully presented virtually.&nbsp;</p> <p> While Open Space is known for its apparent lack of structure and welcoming of surprises, it is actually very structured &mdash; but that structure is so perfectly fit to the people and the work at hand, that any chaos goes unnoticed in its proper role of energizing work. In fact, the stories and work plans woven in Open Space are generally more complex and durable, and can develop a great deal faster, than traditional- or management-driven designs.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p align="center"> <strong>Four Principles of Open Space</strong></p> <p> <img alt="" class="img-thumbnail img-responsive" src="http://www.zapposinsights.com/files/accounts/zappos/assets/images/content/OpenSpace2.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px; float: right; margin: 10px;" /></p> <p> There are Four Principles of Open Space. In my first Open Space experience, I fell in love with these principles, which guides one&rsquo;s behavior throughout the meeting:</p> <p> Principle One: Whoever comes is the right person. The fundamental requirement is that people who care to do something show up. I showed up.</p> <p> Principle Two: Whatever happens is the only thing that could have. This keeps people focused on the here and now, eliminating all could-haves, should-haves, or might-have-beens. Even as one who is a chronic multi-tasker, I remained very much focused on the &ldquo;what is&rdquo; of that meeting and nothing else.</p> <p> Principle Three: Whenever it starts is the right time. This is based on the fact that inspired performance and genuine creativity rarely, if ever, pay attention to the clock. I entered the 2-hr meeting an hour after it started due to a prior meeting commitment and was still able to jump right into the existing flow and know what was happening.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p> Principle Four: When it&rsquo;s over, it&rsquo;s over. In other words, don&rsquo;t waste time. Do what you have to do, then move on to something else useful. I liked how the facilitator in our Open Space meeting was very hands-off from any real &ldquo;take charge&rdquo; duty, except at the end when time for the meeting to officially end. He said, &ldquo;Out of respect for your time, if you need to leave, leave. If you wish to stay, do so.&rdquo;&nbsp; That&rsquo;s it! Then he went back to engaging with the rest of us. So, the meeting ended when it finally fizzled out, I suppose. I left before that time.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p align="center"> <strong>One Law of Open Space</strong></p> <p> There is One Law of Open Space. It&rsquo;s the so-called Law of Two Feet. It simply means if at any time you find yourself in any situation during the meeting where you are neither learning nor contributing, use your two feet and move somewhere else! That could be to another group, or outside to rejuvenate your body and mind by the sun&rsquo;s rays.</p> <p> The key is to not stay somewhere and be miserable or unproductive.&nbsp; When it was time for me to move my two feet out of that meeting, I didn&rsquo;t feel guilty about leaving others there still brainstorming. I contributed something, then moved on to our campus&rsquo; bistro to get a bite to eat. I like this One Law!</p> <p> In Zappos&#39; ever-changing work environment, an Open Space structure proves a great fit. Our Holacratic, self-managing environment requires us, as individuals, to consistently build on our competencies in order to remain more adaptive and more resilient to our company&rsquo;s ongoing quest to streamline our efforts.</p> <p> In keeping with our Core Value #6, to Build Open and Honest Relationships with Communication, Open Space helps us to put our best foot forward when problem-solving. It is one more un-conventional tool to make it easy to find and understand the resources we need to succeed as individuals and team members, while moving Zappos forward.&nbsp;</p> <p> To paraphrase the words of one Open Space practitioner, although one can&#39;t predict specific outcomes in this type of setting, some of the inspiring side effects of Open Space are laughter, hard work which feels like play, surprising results, and fascinating new questions. My fascinating new question is why hadn&rsquo;t I heard of this wonderfully productive style of meeting a long time ago?&nbsp;</p> </div> <p class="date"> 10/12/2016 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script type="text/javascript" src="//ws.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "cec80d9a-458b-434f-a39f-c0b9f446c13e", doNotHash: false, doNotCopy: false, hashAddressBar: false});</script> <div class="socialBar"> <span class='st_facebook_hcount' displayText='Facebook'></span> <span class='st_twitter_hcount' displayText='Tweet'></span> <span class='st_linkedin_hcount' displayText='LinkedIn'></span> <span class='st_googleplus_hcount' displayText='Google +'></span> </div><div class="summary"> <p> Open Space meeting: a purpose-driven meeting framework. It has stood the test of time&mdash;30 years and counting, as a matter of fact. Yet, how much do you know about it?</p> </div> <div class="html clearfix clear"> <p> I&rsquo;ve asked several people about Open Space, and at best, they could guess what it meant simply by the name. However, none had any accurate knowledge of this concept with regards to its approach to meetings, conferences, corporate retreats, symposiums, and similar events. I had no knowledge of it either, until recently, when I experienced an Open Space process firsthand. I am so impressed by its value that I am compelled to share about it.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p align="center"> <strong>Open Space&rsquo;s beginnings</strong></p> <p> Open Space seems to have appeared on the global scene in the mid 1980&rsquo;s, when Harrison Owen grew weary of organizing and hosting annual traditional conferences centered around his white paper on Organization Transformation. In a third year planning session, the idea came to him to conduct the conference in an open, unstructured style. Feedback from previous events indicated that people enjoyed the coffee breaks most. From that, he made a conscious effort to focus most on what works in the meetings.</p> <p> Owen&rsquo;s invitation, as well as his opening statement for that year&rsquo;s conference, informed the attendees the format would be open and they would self-organize around the issues essential to their purpose for being there. His plan also allowed the grunt work normally performed by leadership (basically just him in those early years) to be distributed and assigned to his participants. Everyone became responsible for maximizing their own productivity and learning capacity.</p> <p> Many of Owen&rsquo;s basic ideas for this framework were taken from his experience as a biblical scholar, pastor, Peace Corps organizer in the villages of West Africa, federal government staffer and organization development consultant in Washington DC. He also took ideas from Native American tradition and those of the East, as well as various group dynamics wherever he traveled.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p align="center"> <strong>Open Space&rsquo;s Effectiveness</strong></p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> Twenty-five years later, Owen&rsquo;s conferences were continuing with over 100,000 different Open Space meetings held in corporations in over 160 countries; representing 21 different languages. Proof of the format&rsquo;s effectiveness. Its participants have described the method as: &ldquo;spirit at work,&rdquo; &ldquo;passion bounded by responsibility,&rdquo; &ldquo;intentional self-organization,&rdquo; &ldquo;chaos and creativity,&rdquo; and &ldquo;evolution in organization.&rdquo;</p> <p> In its typical setting, issues of importance or conflicts are posted on a community bulletin board, sometimes referred to as the Marketplace Wall. As each issue is worked through, additional notes and products (i.e. an aggregated report, or list of takeaways identified at the end) get posted based on everyone&rsquo;s contributions. It&rsquo;s a simple way to foster productivity, whether there are five people or five thousand in attendance.</p> <p> If at all possible, plenty of markers, papers, tape, chairs, whiteboards, and flipcharts should be on hand for the meeting. If these items aren&rsquo;t available, a space and a time is all that is really needed; this format can even be successfully presented virtually.&nbsp;</p> <p> While Open Space is known for its apparent lack of structure and welcoming of surprises, it is actually very structured &mdash; but that structure is so perfectly fit to the people and the work at hand, that any chaos goes unnoticed in its proper role of energizing work. In fact, the stories and work plans woven in Open Space are generally more complex and durable, and can develop a great deal faster, than traditional- or management-driven designs.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p align="center"> <strong>Four Principles of Open Space</strong></p> <p> <img alt="" class="img-thumbnail img-responsive" src="http://www.zapposinsights.com/files/accounts/zappos/assets/images/content/OpenSpace2.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px; float: right; margin: 10px;" /></p> <p> There are Four Principles of Open Space. In my first Open Space experience, I fell in love with these principles, which guides one&rsquo;s behavior throughout the meeting:</p> <p> Principle One: Whoever comes is the right person. The fundamental requirement is that people who care to do something show up. I showed up.</p> <p> Principle Two: Whatever happens is the only thing that could have. This keeps people focused on the here and now, eliminating all could-haves, should-haves, or might-have-beens. Even as one who is a chronic multi-tasker, I remained very much focused on the &ldquo;what is&rdquo; of that meeting and nothing else.</p> <p> Principle Three: Whenever it starts is the right time. This is based on the fact that inspired performance and genuine creativity rarely, if ever, pay attention to the clock. I entered the 2-hr meeting an hour after it started due to a prior meeting commitment and was still able to jump right into the existing flow and know what was happening.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p> Principle Four: When it&rsquo;s over, it&rsquo;s over. In other words, don&rsquo;t waste time. Do what you have to do, then move on to something else useful. I liked how the facilitator in our Open Space meeting was very hands-off from any real &ldquo;take charge&rdquo; duty, except at the end when time for the meeting to officially end. He said, &ldquo;Out of respect for your time, if you need to leave, leave. If you wish to stay, do so.&rdquo;&nbsp; That&rsquo;s it! Then he went back to engaging with the rest of us. So, the meeting ended when it finally fizzled out, I suppose. I left before that time.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p align="center"> <strong>One Law of Open Space</strong></p> <p> There is One Law of Open Space. It&rsquo;s the so-called Law of Two Feet. It simply means if at any time you find yourself in any situation during the meeting where you are neither learning nor contributing, use your two feet and move somewhere else! That could be to another group, or outside to rejuvenate your body and mind by the sun&rsquo;s rays.</p> <p> The key is to not stay somewhere and be miserable or unproductive.&nbsp; When it was time for me to move my two feet out of that meeting, I didn&rsquo;t feel guilty about leaving others there still brainstorming. I contributed something, then moved on to our campus&rsquo; bistro to get a bite to eat. I like this One Law!</p> <p> In Zappos&#39; ever-changing work environment, an Open Space structure proves a great fit. Our Holacratic, self-managing environment requires us, as individuals, to consistently build on our competencies in order to remain more adaptive and more resilient to our company&rsquo;s ongoing quest to streamline our efforts.</p> <p> In keeping with our Core Value #6, to Build Open and Honest Relationships with Communication, Open Space helps us to put our best foot forward when problem-solving. It is one more un-conventional tool to make it easy to find and understand the resources we need to succeed as individuals and team members, while moving Zappos forward.&nbsp;</p> <p> To paraphrase the words of one Open Space practitioner, although one can&#39;t predict specific outcomes in this type of setting, some of the inspiring side effects of Open Space are laughter, hard work which feels like play, surprising results, and fascinating new questions. My fascinating new question is why hadn&rsquo;t I heard of this wonderfully productive style of meeting a long time ago?&nbsp;</p> </div> http://www.zapposinsights.com/blog/item/open-space-works-for-zappos http://www.zapposinsights.com/blog/item/open-space-works-for-zappos Wed, 12 Oct 2016 22:31:12 GMT Diversity & The Workplace <p class="date"> 09/16/2016 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script type="text/javascript" src="//ws.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "cec80d9a-458b-434f-a39f-c0b9f446c13e", doNotHash: false, doNotCopy: false, hashAddressBar: false});</script> <div class="socialBar"> <span class='st_facebook_hcount' displayText='Facebook'></span> <span class='st_twitter_hcount' displayText='Tweet'></span> <span class='st_linkedin_hcount' displayText='LinkedIn'></span> <span class='st_googleplus_hcount' displayText='Google +'></span> </div><div class="summary"> <p> In 2014, a much-vaunted app was released; the creators claimed this app would be a one-stop shop for personal health. Users could track calories consumed, blood alcohol content, respiratory rate, and vitamin intake; they could also look for information on ways to improve health, and advice on symptoms they were suffering. The app&rsquo;s creators claimed that this was the future of personal healthcare, and the app did much of what it claimed, with a single glaring exception.</p> </div> <div class="html clearfix clear"> <p> The app, and its associated programming interface, didn&rsquo;t have a single jot or line of data about women&rsquo;s health. There was no way to track menstrual cycles, no information on sexual health for women, no information about female-specific disease. Nothing. How was it possible for such a high-profile app to have such a massive hole in its construction? The answer is very simple- the development team didn&rsquo;t have a single woman. From start to finish, the app was built entirely by men, and in the echo chamber that resulted, no one thought to create any software for basic women&rsquo;s health.</p> <p> This exemplifies why diversity is so incredibly important in today&rsquo;s workplace. A lack of diversity in a team leads to a lack of diverse <img alt="" class="img-responsive img-thumbnail" src="http://www.zapposinsights.com/files/accounts/zappos/assets/images/photos/Parade.2.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 200px; float: right; margin: 10px;" />viewpoints; a lack of viewpoints leads to a very narrow outlook and a similarly narrow production. The metaphorical &ldquo;echo chamber&rdquo; arises because it&rsquo;s simply impossible to fully realize and empathize with experiences and viewpoints other than your own- you can&rsquo;t change your own past, and you can&rsquo;t spot a flaw in your own knowledge based on that past.</p> <p> At Zappos, we are people of all sorts of colors, shapes, sizes, creeds, shoe size, hobbies, and favorite foods. We try to realize that there are no stereotypes, that every single person is a full and unique individual. Beyond that, we encourage bringing yourself and your unique passions to work, adding your individual outlook and skills to the resources of the company. We don&rsquo;t succeed flawlessly- biases always exist, and every day is a struggle to avoid instinctual or baked-in patterns of thought, biased behavior. We attempt to avoid the myth of the &ldquo;professional&rdquo;- there are no dress codes, no guides for hair color or desk decorations, because we believe that stifling the individual to make them fit into the mold of what a &ldquo;professional&rdquo; looks like is not only pointless, but actively harmful to the company. Only when people are allowed to truly be themselves- to have a Brain-In-A-Jar on their desk, or to juggle while they think, or come to work in a Batman onesie- are they able to commit themselves fully to work, to adapt and change and solve problems.</p> <p> Oddly enough, a commitment to diversity and personal freedom can actually calcify into its own bias. Even here at Zappos, there are often currents of feeling that you&rsquo;re not allowed to wear a suit and tie, even if that&rsquo;s what you enjoy, because Zappos isn&rsquo;t a normal place. Sometimes people feel like they can&rsquo;t be quiet, or be introverted, because Zappos is loud, even if that&rsquo;s how they operate and are comfortable. It&rsquo;s a difficulty of self-improvement- we may feel like we&rsquo;ve conquered our biases, and therefore assume that we&rsquo;re immune to developing new or different ones. To truly open a workplace to including all types of workers, we need to conquer our preconceptions anew every day. Doing so, the increase in new ideas is tremendous- freeing people to be themselves allows for an amazing amount of creativity in their work. Diversity, true diversity, means that there are no ideas so outlandish that they&rsquo;re dismissed out of hand. We work every day to improve- we&rsquo;re not perfect, but we strive to make our workplace absolutely open, a place where everyone can feel safe to really be themselves. Until next time, this is Chris, your friendly Zappos Pirate, signing off. Ar-har!</p> </div> <p class="date"> 09/16/2016 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script type="text/javascript" src="//ws.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "cec80d9a-458b-434f-a39f-c0b9f446c13e", doNotHash: false, doNotCopy: false, hashAddressBar: false});</script> <div class="socialBar"> <span class='st_facebook_hcount' displayText='Facebook'></span> <span class='st_twitter_hcount' displayText='Tweet'></span> <span class='st_linkedin_hcount' displayText='LinkedIn'></span> <span class='st_googleplus_hcount' displayText='Google +'></span> </div><div class="summary"> <p> In 2014, a much-vaunted app was released; the creators claimed this app would be a one-stop shop for personal health. Users could track calories consumed, blood alcohol content, respiratory rate, and vitamin intake; they could also look for information on ways to improve health, and advice on symptoms they were suffering. The app&rsquo;s creators claimed that this was the future of personal healthcare, and the app did much of what it claimed, with a single glaring exception.</p> </div> <div class="html clearfix clear"> <p> The app, and its associated programming interface, didn&rsquo;t have a single jot or line of data about women&rsquo;s health. There was no way to track menstrual cycles, no information on sexual health for women, no information about female-specific disease. Nothing. How was it possible for such a high-profile app to have such a massive hole in its construction? The answer is very simple- the development team didn&rsquo;t have a single woman. From start to finish, the app was built entirely by men, and in the echo chamber that resulted, no one thought to create any software for basic women&rsquo;s health.</p> <p> This exemplifies why diversity is so incredibly important in today&rsquo;s workplace. A lack of diversity in a team leads to a lack of diverse <img alt="" class="img-responsive img-thumbnail" src="http://www.zapposinsights.com/files/accounts/zappos/assets/images/photos/Parade.2.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 200px; float: right; margin: 10px;" />viewpoints; a lack of viewpoints leads to a very narrow outlook and a similarly narrow production. The metaphorical &ldquo;echo chamber&rdquo; arises because it&rsquo;s simply impossible to fully realize and empathize with experiences and viewpoints other than your own- you can&rsquo;t change your own past, and you can&rsquo;t spot a flaw in your own knowledge based on that past.</p> <p> At Zappos, we are people of all sorts of colors, shapes, sizes, creeds, shoe size, hobbies, and favorite foods. We try to realize that there are no stereotypes, that every single person is a full and unique individual. Beyond that, we encourage bringing yourself and your unique passions to work, adding your individual outlook and skills to the resources of the company. We don&rsquo;t succeed flawlessly- biases always exist, and every day is a struggle to avoid instinctual or baked-in patterns of thought, biased behavior. We attempt to avoid the myth of the &ldquo;professional&rdquo;- there are no dress codes, no guides for hair color or desk decorations, because we believe that stifling the individual to make them fit into the mold of what a &ldquo;professional&rdquo; looks like is not only pointless, but actively harmful to the company. Only when people are allowed to truly be themselves- to have a Brain-In-A-Jar on their desk, or to juggle while they think, or come to work in a Batman onesie- are they able to commit themselves fully to work, to adapt and change and solve problems.</p> <p> Oddly enough, a commitment to diversity and personal freedom can actually calcify into its own bias. Even here at Zappos, there are often currents of feeling that you&rsquo;re not allowed to wear a suit and tie, even if that&rsquo;s what you enjoy, because Zappos isn&rsquo;t a normal place. Sometimes people feel like they can&rsquo;t be quiet, or be introverted, because Zappos is loud, even if that&rsquo;s how they operate and are comfortable. It&rsquo;s a difficulty of self-improvement- we may feel like we&rsquo;ve conquered our biases, and therefore assume that we&rsquo;re immune to developing new or different ones. To truly open a workplace to including all types of workers, we need to conquer our preconceptions anew every day. Doing so, the increase in new ideas is tremendous- freeing people to be themselves allows for an amazing amount of creativity in their work. Diversity, true diversity, means that there are no ideas so outlandish that they&rsquo;re dismissed out of hand. We work every day to improve- we&rsquo;re not perfect, but we strive to make our workplace absolutely open, a place where everyone can feel safe to really be themselves. Until next time, this is Chris, your friendly Zappos Pirate, signing off. Ar-har!</p> </div> http://www.zapposinsights.com/blog/item/diversity-the-workplace http://www.zapposinsights.com/blog/item/diversity-the-workplace Fri, 16 Sep 2016 20:25:58 GMT How Your Open Office Space Measures Up <p class="date"> 09/08/2016 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script type="text/javascript" src="//ws.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "cec80d9a-458b-434f-a39f-c0b9f446c13e", doNotHash: false, doNotCopy: false, hashAddressBar: false});</script> <div class="socialBar"> <span class='st_facebook_hcount' displayText='Facebook'></span> <span class='st_twitter_hcount' displayText='Tweet'></span> <span class='st_linkedin_hcount' displayText='LinkedIn'></span> <span class='st_googleplus_hcount' displayText='Google +'></span> </div><div class="summary"> <p> From the 1870s mineral excavations comes the popular phrase, &ldquo;There&rsquo;s gold in them thar hills.&rdquo; From the 2000s U.S. corporate offices&rsquo; open-space trend comes the notion, &ldquo;There&rsquo;s gold in them thar open floor plans.&rdquo; Gold, as in golden opportunities for efficiency, transparency, inclusivity, accessibility and increased engagement, just to name a few.</p> </div> <div class="html clearfix clear"> <p style="text-align: center;"> <img alt="" src="http://www.zapposinsights.com/files/accounts/zappos/assets/images/photos/Merch.Rear.Wide.JPG" style="width: 800px; height: 400px;" /></p> <p> Open floor plans are quite the norm these days for over 70 percent of U.S. offices. While not a design fit for every company, it&rsquo;s certainly proven successful for Zappos through 16 years of changes, challenges and growth to approximately 1500 employees. From day one, our shared spaces have been super eclectic, organically-charged and customized to fit each team&rsquo;s needs or desires, while maintaining the employee&rsquo;s unique flair.</p> <p> At Zappos, it&rsquo;s easy to spot signs everywhere of a heightened sense of community, connectivity and even cultural pride spurred by this fun type of floor plan. It allows for spur-of-the moment engagement and teambuilding, while still offering secluded areas for private meetings or necessary quiet space for creative blog writing.</p> <p> Even with all its benefits, any astute CEO considering this type of environment would be justified in doubting whether floor plan alone equates to increased employee engagement. After all, let&rsquo;s be clear, engaged employees are what successful companies yearn for.</p> <p> Unlike <em>satisfied</em> employees, whose commitment may end with merely showing up for work, <em>engaged</em> employees connect emotionally to take a company&rsquo;s vision to the next level. According to Gallup reports, engaged workers tend to collaborate more on ideas to improve business processes because they feel empowered to do so. This charges them with positive energy for higher productivity.&nbsp;</p> <p> So, the question remains, how can one determine if this floor plan brings all that about? While metrics provide measurements of pro&shy;duc&shy;tiv&shy;ity and qual&shy;ity in customer service performances and inventory management helps to gauge sales, profitability, and cash flow, I believe one may have to rely primarily on observations of human interaction rather than hard core numbers to answer that question.</p> <p> From my personal experience, having 300,000 square feet of lively and wacky open space offers us a huge advantage, but is yet only a start. From there, it is a matter of what you do with that space and the culture you build within.</p> <p> For instance, a company must first get, and keep, its entire staff aligned within that space. At Zappos, we have 10 Core Values to ensure we accomplish that. Our open environment just happens to work hand in hand with Core Value #6: Build open and honest relationships with communication. Communication is easier when barriers are removed&mdash;both literal and figurative. Freedom from bureaucratic red tapeand the ability to have questions answered across a table instead of via email leads to increased engagement, as well.</p> <p> Secondly, the atmosphere has to inspire its employees to want to be there. When employees trust &ldquo;their space,&rdquo; whether open or enclosed, and are encouraged to be adventurous, creative and open-minded, they feel valued and are proud to contribute.They will gladly step into paths offered them to grow, learn and develop with the company. Those are indicators that Gallup says makes an employee perform well and stay engaged.</p> <p> Finally, sometimes the best thing you can add to your office space to make it successful is to give your employees a small but impressionable personal experience that forever changes their perception of their work environment. For me, this experience occurred when I learned our CEO, Tony Hsieh, responds personally to every single employee who reached out to him in person or via email.</p> <p> When I was just six months into my Zappos employment, I had emailed Tony with a suggestion about something customer service related. Within 48 hours, he responded and connected me with a couple individuals within the company who could further assist me. And guess what? Those folks responded promptly, too! My correspondence wasn&rsquo;t regarded as a lowly neophyte&rsquo;s wish, soon to be lost in the executive level abyss.</p> <p> Then, on my birthday, I received a &ldquo;Happy Birthday&rdquo; email from Tony. I was touched, and thanked him, thinking surely his staff sends out these and company anniversary emails on his behalf. One day, I met one of his staff administrators who informed me that Tony absolutely handles all employee-related email himself, his staff does not. We&rsquo;re talking personal notes to/from some 1500 employees! Now, that&rsquo;s impressive!</p> <p> On Tony&rsquo;s birthday, I send <em>him</em> an email; he responds with a &ldquo;Thank you.&rdquo; From a CEO of a billion dollar company, that&rsquo;s creating value that needs no measurement.&nbsp;</p> </div> <p class="date"> 09/08/2016 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script type="text/javascript" src="//ws.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "cec80d9a-458b-434f-a39f-c0b9f446c13e", doNotHash: false, doNotCopy: false, hashAddressBar: false});</script> <div class="socialBar"> <span class='st_facebook_hcount' displayText='Facebook'></span> <span class='st_twitter_hcount' displayText='Tweet'></span> <span class='st_linkedin_hcount' displayText='LinkedIn'></span> <span class='st_googleplus_hcount' displayText='Google +'></span> </div><div class="summary"> <p> From the 1870s mineral excavations comes the popular phrase, &ldquo;There&rsquo;s gold in them thar hills.&rdquo; From the 2000s U.S. corporate offices&rsquo; open-space trend comes the notion, &ldquo;There&rsquo;s gold in them thar open floor plans.&rdquo; Gold, as in golden opportunities for efficiency, transparency, inclusivity, accessibility and increased engagement, just to name a few.</p> </div> <div class="html clearfix clear"> <p style="text-align: center;"> <img alt="" src="http://www.zapposinsights.com/files/accounts/zappos/assets/images/photos/Merch.Rear.Wide.JPG" style="width: 800px; height: 400px;" /></p> <p> Open floor plans are quite the norm these days for over 70 percent of U.S. offices. While not a design fit for every company, it&rsquo;s certainly proven successful for Zappos through 16 years of changes, challenges and growth to approximately 1500 employees. From day one, our shared spaces have been super eclectic, organically-charged and customized to fit each team&rsquo;s needs or desires, while maintaining the employee&rsquo;s unique flair.</p> <p> At Zappos, it&rsquo;s easy to spot signs everywhere of a heightened sense of community, connectivity and even cultural pride spurred by this fun type of floor plan. It allows for spur-of-the moment engagement and teambuilding, while still offering secluded areas for private meetings or necessary quiet space for creative blog writing.</p> <p> Even with all its benefits, any astute CEO considering this type of environment would be justified in doubting whether floor plan alone equates to increased employee engagement. After all, let&rsquo;s be clear, engaged employees are what successful companies yearn for.</p> <p> Unlike <em>satisfied</em> employees, whose commitment may end with merely showing up for work, <em>engaged</em> employees connect emotionally to take a company&rsquo;s vision to the next level. According to Gallup reports, engaged workers tend to collaborate more on ideas to improve business processes because they feel empowered to do so. This charges them with positive energy for higher productivity.&nbsp;</p> <p> So, the question remains, how can one determine if this floor plan brings all that about? While metrics provide measurements of pro&shy;duc&shy;tiv&shy;ity and qual&shy;ity in customer service performances and inventory management helps to gauge sales, profitability, and cash flow, I believe one may have to rely primarily on observations of human interaction rather than hard core numbers to answer that question.</p> <p> From my personal experience, having 300,000 square feet of lively and wacky open space offers us a huge advantage, but is yet only a start. From there, it is a matter of what you do with that space and the culture you build within.</p> <p> For instance, a company must first get, and keep, its entire staff aligned within that space. At Zappos, we have 10 Core Values to ensure we accomplish that. Our open environment just happens to work hand in hand with Core Value #6: Build open and honest relationships with communication. Communication is easier when barriers are removed&mdash;both literal and figurative. Freedom from bureaucratic red tapeand the ability to have questions answered across a table instead of via email leads to increased engagement, as well.</p> <p> Secondly, the atmosphere has to inspire its employees to want to be there. When employees trust &ldquo;their space,&rdquo; whether open or enclosed, and are encouraged to be adventurous, creative and open-minded, they feel valued and are proud to contribute.They will gladly step into paths offered them to grow, learn and develop with the company. Those are indicators that Gallup says makes an employee perform well and stay engaged.</p> <p> Finally, sometimes the best thing you can add to your office space to make it successful is to give your employees a small but impressionable personal experience that forever changes their perception of their work environment. For me, this experience occurred when I learned our CEO, Tony Hsieh, responds personally to every single employee who reached out to him in person or via email.</p> <p> When I was just six months into my Zappos employment, I had emailed Tony with a suggestion about something customer service related. Within 48 hours, he responded and connected me with a couple individuals within the company who could further assist me. And guess what? Those folks responded promptly, too! My correspondence wasn&rsquo;t regarded as a lowly neophyte&rsquo;s wish, soon to be lost in the executive level abyss.</p> <p> Then, on my birthday, I received a &ldquo;Happy Birthday&rdquo; email from Tony. I was touched, and thanked him, thinking surely his staff sends out these and company anniversary emails on his behalf. One day, I met one of his staff administrators who informed me that Tony absolutely handles all employee-related email himself, his staff does not. We&rsquo;re talking personal notes to/from some 1500 employees! Now, that&rsquo;s impressive!</p> <p> On Tony&rsquo;s birthday, I send <em>him</em> an email; he responds with a &ldquo;Thank you.&rdquo; From a CEO of a billion dollar company, that&rsquo;s creating value that needs no measurement.&nbsp;</p> </div> http://www.zapposinsights.com/blog/item/how-your-open-office-space-measures-up http://www.zapposinsights.com/blog/item/how-your-open-office-space-measures-up Thu, 08 Sep 2016 18:32:03 GMT Pursue Growth & Learning Series - Article Takeaways: “Adapting Change to Fit Complexity” <p class="date"> 06/23/2016 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script type="text/javascript" src="//ws.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "cec80d9a-458b-434f-a39f-c0b9f446c13e", doNotHash: false, doNotCopy: false, hashAddressBar: false});</script> <div class="socialBar"> <span class='st_facebook_hcount' displayText='Facebook'></span> <span class='st_twitter_hcount' displayText='Tweet'></span> <span class='st_linkedin_hcount' displayText='LinkedIn'></span> <span class='st_googleplus_hcount' displayText='Google +'></span> </div><div class="summary"> <p> Below are key learnings from the article &lsquo;Adapting Change to Fit Complexity&rsquo;, written by Dawna Jones, published on the Huffington Post.</p> </div> <div class="html clearfix clear"> <div style="font-family:'Helvetica Neue';font-size:14px;"> <div> <div style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);"> <div> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 20px; font-family: Helvetica, Arial, 'Droid Sans', sans-serif;"> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/great-work-cultures/adapting-change-to-fit-co_b_9549070.html" shape="rect" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; word-break: break-all; color: rgb(4, 122, 198);" target="_blank">http://www.huffingtonpost.com/great-work-cultures/adapting-change-to-fit-co_b_9549070.html</a></div> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> &nbsp;</div> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> What if decision makers instigating change are seeing the inherent nature of companies all wrong?</div> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> &nbsp;</div> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> The Traditional View - Assume the Company is a Machine</div> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> &nbsp;</div> <ul style="margin: 0.2857em 0px 0.714285em 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Change initiatives make the mistake of fixing the parts, while neglecting to witness the effect on the entire interaction</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Business is typically about rationale, so assumption is that change happens using mental intellect</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Mistake to think that if you fix what is showing on the surface, the whole system will respond predictably</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Typical strategy is to get buy-in and then push change forward but it can create the resistance you are trying to avoid</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Assumptions and consequences of these assumptions in traditional view <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Change is controllable. Outcome engineered <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> result: incremental results</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Thinking how we always have will create system-wide change <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> result: emotions and relationships ignored, negative impact</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Focus on problem solving will solve more problems <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> result: Whatever you focus on expands. Focusing on problem solving expands the number of problems to be solved. Attention is given to the negative. Eventually, an addiction to crisis can result which increases risk of missing opportunities.</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Innovation happens with linear/predictable thinking <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> result: Creativity is limited to mavericks</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> People resist change so telling and selling required <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> result:&nbsp;Resistance to change is created by not attending to fundamental human values. Will I be safe? Will my basic human needs for belonging and emotional and social security be covered? How will this change affect my personal life?</li> </ul> </li> </ul> </li> </ul> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> The Living System View - Complex Communities Propelled by Networks of Relationships</div> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> &nbsp;</div> <ul style="margin: 0.2857em 0px 0.714285em 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Looks at the whole, not parts</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Must understand interaction between formal designed structure along with it&#39;s informal networks that get work done</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Social/emotional data is critical&nbsp;</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Zappos example of introducing Holacracy <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Holacracy is a formal system/structure</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> If it was introduced without consideration of our informal networks, it would confine instead of liberating creative potential. Would feel like moving through molasses <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> <em style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;">I actually think we missed on this - didn&#39;t consider our culture, people, emotions enough</em></li> </ul> </li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> How to change living systems? <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Use a broad perspective without sacrificing details</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Details provide cues to what is emerging next</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Requires a much more advanced awareness and skill set</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Analytical thinking is fine, just not applied to every single situation</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Vitality of a company, ability to flex, learn and be creative is rooted in informal, fluid networks connected by meaning</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> One person coming in or leaving can change the character of the network <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> <em style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;">Interesting thought from a recruiting perspective and from not moving fast enough to term</em></li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> &quot;A machine can be controlled. A living system can only be disturbed.&quot;</li> </ul> </li> </ul> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> How to tickle the system for quantum speed</div> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> &nbsp;</div> <ul style="margin: 0.2857em 0px 0.714285em 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Looking at change implementation from understanding of complex living system means stepping out of the mind, into the heart</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Companies that ignore the power of caring, belonging, and inspiration to performance, they will never adapt fast enough</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Engage with what matters to people, what you are collectively committed to achieving - then change will happen faster and easier</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Core elements to doing this <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Vision - visionary leader at the helm</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Message - autonomy and freedom to exercise creative imitative without fear of retribution is force behind innovation and lasting change</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Creativity - comfort with uncertainty and commitment to learning <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Can use methods of dialogue, story, appreciative inquiry, trust building convos, play, outdoor experiential learning.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Also have to learn how to access the wisdom beyond intellect - discover this thru heightened awareness</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Learning - experiment, failing is ok, mind open and attentively focused</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Self-Collective transformation - more conscious and courageous leader to let go of the old - leader as integrator not controller</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Mindfulness before action - &nbsp;non-judgementally receive and accept information without feeling need to control it or bend it to your existing framework</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Effecting change in a complex living system is inspired not driven</li> <li> &nbsp;</li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p class="date"> 06/23/2016 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script type="text/javascript" src="//ws.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "cec80d9a-458b-434f-a39f-c0b9f446c13e", doNotHash: false, doNotCopy: false, hashAddressBar: false});</script> <div class="socialBar"> <span class='st_facebook_hcount' displayText='Facebook'></span> <span class='st_twitter_hcount' displayText='Tweet'></span> <span class='st_linkedin_hcount' displayText='LinkedIn'></span> <span class='st_googleplus_hcount' displayText='Google +'></span> </div><div class="summary"> <p> Below are key learnings from the article &lsquo;Adapting Change to Fit Complexity&rsquo;, written by Dawna Jones, published on the Huffington Post.</p> </div> <div class="html clearfix clear"> <div style="font-family:'Helvetica Neue';font-size:14px;"> <div> <div style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);"> <div> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 20px; font-family: Helvetica, Arial, 'Droid Sans', sans-serif;"> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/great-work-cultures/adapting-change-to-fit-co_b_9549070.html" shape="rect" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; word-break: break-all; color: rgb(4, 122, 198);" target="_blank">http://www.huffingtonpost.com/great-work-cultures/adapting-change-to-fit-co_b_9549070.html</a></div> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> &nbsp;</div> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> What if decision makers instigating change are seeing the inherent nature of companies all wrong?</div> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> &nbsp;</div> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> The Traditional View - Assume the Company is a Machine</div> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> &nbsp;</div> <ul style="margin: 0.2857em 0px 0.714285em 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Change initiatives make the mistake of fixing the parts, while neglecting to witness the effect on the entire interaction</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Business is typically about rationale, so assumption is that change happens using mental intellect</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Mistake to think that if you fix what is showing on the surface, the whole system will respond predictably</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Typical strategy is to get buy-in and then push change forward but it can create the resistance you are trying to avoid</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Assumptions and consequences of these assumptions in traditional view <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Change is controllable. Outcome engineered <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> result: incremental results</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Thinking how we always have will create system-wide change <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> result: emotions and relationships ignored, negative impact</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Focus on problem solving will solve more problems <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> result: Whatever you focus on expands. Focusing on problem solving expands the number of problems to be solved. Attention is given to the negative. Eventually, an addiction to crisis can result which increases risk of missing opportunities.</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Innovation happens with linear/predictable thinking <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> result: Creativity is limited to mavericks</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> People resist change so telling and selling required <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> result:&nbsp;Resistance to change is created by not attending to fundamental human values. Will I be safe? Will my basic human needs for belonging and emotional and social security be covered? How will this change affect my personal life?</li> </ul> </li> </ul> </li> </ul> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> The Living System View - Complex Communities Propelled by Networks of Relationships</div> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> &nbsp;</div> <ul style="margin: 0.2857em 0px 0.714285em 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Looks at the whole, not parts</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Must understand interaction between formal designed structure along with it&#39;s informal networks that get work done</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Social/emotional data is critical&nbsp;</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Zappos example of introducing Holacracy <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Holacracy is a formal system/structure</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> If it was introduced without consideration of our informal networks, it would confine instead of liberating creative potential. Would feel like moving through molasses <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> <em style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;">I actually think we missed on this - didn&#39;t consider our culture, people, emotions enough</em></li> </ul> </li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> How to change living systems? <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Use a broad perspective without sacrificing details</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Details provide cues to what is emerging next</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Requires a much more advanced awareness and skill set</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Analytical thinking is fine, just not applied to every single situation</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Vitality of a company, ability to flex, learn and be creative is rooted in informal, fluid networks connected by meaning</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> One person coming in or leaving can change the character of the network <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> <em style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;">Interesting thought from a recruiting perspective and from not moving fast enough to term</em></li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> &quot;A machine can be controlled. A living system can only be disturbed.&quot;</li> </ul> </li> </ul> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> How to tickle the system for quantum speed</div> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;"> &nbsp;</div> <ul style="margin: 0.2857em 0px 0.714285em 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Looking at change implementation from understanding of complex living system means stepping out of the mind, into the heart</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Companies that ignore the power of caring, belonging, and inspiration to performance, they will never adapt fast enough</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Engage with what matters to people, what you are collectively committed to achieving - then change will happen faster and easier</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Core elements to doing this <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Vision - visionary leader at the helm</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Message - autonomy and freedom to exercise creative imitative without fear of retribution is force behind innovation and lasting change</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Creativity - comfort with uncertainty and commitment to learning <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Can use methods of dialogue, story, appreciative inquiry, trust building convos, play, outdoor experiential learning.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Also have to learn how to access the wisdom beyond intellect - discover this thru heightened awareness</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Learning - experiment, failing is ok, mind open and attentively focused</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Self-Collective transformation - more conscious and courageous leader to let go of the old - leader as integrator not controller</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Mindfulness before action - &nbsp;non-judgementally receive and accept information without feeling need to control it or bend it to your existing framework</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Effecting change in a complex living system is inspired not driven</li> <li> &nbsp;</li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> http://www.zapposinsights.com/blog/item/pursue-growth-learning-series-article-takeaways-adapting-change-to-fit-complexity http://www.zapposinsights.com/blog/item/pursue-growth-learning-series-article-takeaways-adapting-change-to-fit-complexity Fri, 24 Jun 2016 00:48:44 GMT Pursue Growth & Learning Series - Article Takeaways: “Culture is Not the Culprit” <p class="date"> 05/05/2016 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script type="text/javascript" src="//ws.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "cec80d9a-458b-434f-a39f-c0b9f446c13e", doNotHash: false, doNotCopy: false, hashAddressBar: false});</script> <div class="socialBar"> <span class='st_facebook_hcount' displayText='Facebook'></span> <span class='st_twitter_hcount' displayText='Tweet'></span> <span class='st_linkedin_hcount' displayText='LinkedIn'></span> <span class='st_googleplus_hcount' displayText='Google +'></span> </div><div class="summary"> <p> Below are key learnings from the article&nbsp;<a href="https://hbr.org/2016/04/culture-is-not-the-culprit" target="_blank">&lsquo;Culture is not the Culprit&rsquo;</a>, written by Jay W. Lorsch and Emily McTague, published in the April 2016 issue of Harvard Business review.&nbsp;</p> </div> <div class="html clearfix clear"> <style type="text/css"> #culture, #culture li, #culture ul{ font-size: 1.0em; }</style> <div id="culture"> <div> <ul style="margin: 0.2857em 0px 0.714285em 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 20px; list-style-position: outside; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, 'Droid Sans', sans-serif; font-size: 14px;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Cultural reform has been proposed as the solution to many things wrong in corporations.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> All eyes are on culture as the cause and the cure.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Corporate leaders interviewed&mdash;current and former CEOs who have successfully led major transformations&mdash;say that culture isn&rsquo;t something you &ldquo;fix.&rdquo;</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Cultural change is what you get after you&rsquo;ve put new processes or structures in place to tackle tough business challenges like reworking an outdated strategy or business model.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> The culture evolves as you do that important work.</li> </ul> <ul style="margin: 0.2857em 0px 0.714285em 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 20px; list-style-position: outside; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, 'Droid Sans', sans-serif; font-size: 14px;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> It makes intuitive sense to look at culture as an outcome&mdash;not a cause or a fix. Organizations are complex systems with many ripple effects</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> When the leaders used tools such as decision rights, performance measurement, and reward systems to address their particular business challenges, organizational culture evolved in interesting ways as a result, reinforcing<br clear="none" /> the new direction.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Culture isn&rsquo;t a final destination. It morphs right along with the company&rsquo;s competitive environment and objectives. It&rsquo;s really<br clear="none" /> more of a temporary landing place&mdash;where the organization should be at that moment, if the right management levers have been pulled.</li> </ul> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 20px; font-family: Helvetica, Arial, 'Droid Sans', sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);"> <span style="line-height: 1.42857em; font-size: 18px;"><strong style="line-height: 1.42857em;">Case studies</strong></span></div> <ul style="margin: 0.2857em 0px 0.714285em 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 20px; list-style-position: outside; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, 'Droid Sans', sans-serif; font-size: 14px;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Ecolab <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Problem: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Lots of mergers and acquisitions hurting company&#39;s strength of being customer-centric.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> More silos and leaders spending less and less time close to customer and the front-line staff that was close to the customer.</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Solution: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Push more decision making to front-line staff after carefully training employees closest to customer.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Managers eventually let go and trusted employees.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Used meritocracy to motivate employees to carry out business goals. <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Advancement/rewards/public praise used to signal kind of behavior that was valued.</li> </ul> </li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> End result: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Culture of autonomy and strong focus on customer.</li> </ul> </li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Delta <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Problem: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Delta took over Northwest airlines while coming out of bankruptcy protection and during downturn in air travel - also not a merger, it was a pure takeover, doing things Delta&#39;s way - also Northwest highly unionized and out of touch with employee needs as used to using a go between.</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Solution: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Delegation and empowerment of people around the top leader.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Build strong relationships with employees - learn how to satisfy and motivate both on the job and personally <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Offered best training, flex schedules, best airplanes and good crew hotels.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Good pay and benefits - 10% of earnings for company wide bonuses.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Didn&#39;t group all employee needs together. Ex: Ground staff in NE getting planes out during blizzard have diff needs.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> No nepotism rule - want loyalty and generations of employees who get the company.</li> </ul> </li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> End result: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Management showed cares about people and fed into culture of trust.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Largely got rid of union by employee vote.</li> </ul> </li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Ford <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Problem: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Brink of bankruptcy and lost 25% of market share .</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Management not working collaboratively - too aggressive and cutthroat.</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Solution: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Regular meetings where several levels of execs shared updates on their units. <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Met daily when at peak of crisis.</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Asked leaders to use color coded system (red/yellow/green) to assess overall company performance and their initiatives. It was quick and had a holistic view. <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> At first it was all green as leaders afraid to show vulnerability to which CEO would push, &quot;we lost billions last year and you are telling me there are no problems?&quot;</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Eventually a few brave leaders began speaking up and he praised them for their transparency.</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Fostered personal accountability when managers had to explain problems and headway.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Launched &quot;One Ford&quot; to break up silos and give global view - added global heads of each major area.</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> End result: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Leaders realized being more collaborative and honest allowed them to work together and find solutions faster.</li> </ul> </li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Novartis pharmaceuticals <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Problem: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Merger of 2 competing pharmaceutical companies to create this.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Moved from prescription drug based to diversified portfolio of health care products which was much more complex.</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Solution: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Lead the change with a clear purpose at the top.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Set clear vision and objectives.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Set clear expectations for employees. <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Must be flexible, accountable and act in the customers&#39; interests.</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Set clear metrics for gauging performance and ensuring quality across all areas. <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Good performance management system would help keep employees focused on the right things.</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Make it clear what won&#39;t be tolerated. <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Bribing, bad stories internally.</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Since collaboration and alignment can&#39;t be forced, decentralize decision making to empower people to do what&#39;s best for their areas. <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Let&#39;s teams move faster and think/act more creatively.</li> </ul> </li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> End Result: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Employees became much more customer-centric and performance-minded.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> CEO realized that with each org change made, company&#39;s culture was starting to match the vision he&#39;d outlined early on.</li> </ul> </li> </ul> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <p class="date"> 05/05/2016 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script type="text/javascript" src="//ws.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "cec80d9a-458b-434f-a39f-c0b9f446c13e", doNotHash: false, doNotCopy: false, hashAddressBar: false});</script> <div class="socialBar"> <span class='st_facebook_hcount' displayText='Facebook'></span> <span class='st_twitter_hcount' displayText='Tweet'></span> <span class='st_linkedin_hcount' displayText='LinkedIn'></span> <span class='st_googleplus_hcount' displayText='Google +'></span> </div><div class="summary"> <p> Below are key learnings from the article&nbsp;<a href="https://hbr.org/2016/04/culture-is-not-the-culprit" target="_blank">&lsquo;Culture is not the Culprit&rsquo;</a>, written by Jay W. Lorsch and Emily McTague, published in the April 2016 issue of Harvard Business review.&nbsp;</p> </div> <div class="html clearfix clear"> <style type="text/css"> #culture, #culture li, #culture ul{ font-size: 1.0em; }</style> <div id="culture"> <div> <ul style="margin: 0.2857em 0px 0.714285em 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 20px; list-style-position: outside; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, 'Droid Sans', sans-serif; font-size: 14px;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Cultural reform has been proposed as the solution to many things wrong in corporations.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> All eyes are on culture as the cause and the cure.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Corporate leaders interviewed&mdash;current and former CEOs who have successfully led major transformations&mdash;say that culture isn&rsquo;t something you &ldquo;fix.&rdquo;</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Cultural change is what you get after you&rsquo;ve put new processes or structures in place to tackle tough business challenges like reworking an outdated strategy or business model.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> The culture evolves as you do that important work.</li> </ul> <ul style="margin: 0.2857em 0px 0.714285em 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 20px; list-style-position: outside; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, 'Droid Sans', sans-serif; font-size: 14px;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> It makes intuitive sense to look at culture as an outcome&mdash;not a cause or a fix. Organizations are complex systems with many ripple effects</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> When the leaders used tools such as decision rights, performance measurement, and reward systems to address their particular business challenges, organizational culture evolved in interesting ways as a result, reinforcing<br clear="none" /> the new direction.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Culture isn&rsquo;t a final destination. It morphs right along with the company&rsquo;s competitive environment and objectives. It&rsquo;s really<br clear="none" /> more of a temporary landing place&mdash;where the organization should be at that moment, if the right management levers have been pulled.</li> </ul> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 20px; font-family: Helvetica, Arial, 'Droid Sans', sans-serif; font-size: 14px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);"> <span style="line-height: 1.42857em; font-size: 18px;"><strong style="line-height: 1.42857em;">Case studies</strong></span></div> <ul style="margin: 0.2857em 0px 0.714285em 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 20px; list-style-position: outside; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, 'Droid Sans', sans-serif; font-size: 14px;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Ecolab <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Problem: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Lots of mergers and acquisitions hurting company&#39;s strength of being customer-centric.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> More silos and leaders spending less and less time close to customer and the front-line staff that was close to the customer.</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Solution: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Push more decision making to front-line staff after carefully training employees closest to customer.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Managers eventually let go and trusted employees.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Used meritocracy to motivate employees to carry out business goals. <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Advancement/rewards/public praise used to signal kind of behavior that was valued.</li> </ul> </li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> End result: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Culture of autonomy and strong focus on customer.</li> </ul> </li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Delta <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Problem: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Delta took over Northwest airlines while coming out of bankruptcy protection and during downturn in air travel - also not a merger, it was a pure takeover, doing things Delta&#39;s way - also Northwest highly unionized and out of touch with employee needs as used to using a go between.</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Solution: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Delegation and empowerment of people around the top leader.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Build strong relationships with employees - learn how to satisfy and motivate both on the job and personally <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Offered best training, flex schedules, best airplanes and good crew hotels.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Good pay and benefits - 10% of earnings for company wide bonuses.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Didn&#39;t group all employee needs together. Ex: Ground staff in NE getting planes out during blizzard have diff needs.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> No nepotism rule - want loyalty and generations of employees who get the company.</li> </ul> </li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> End result: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Management showed cares about people and fed into culture of trust.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Largely got rid of union by employee vote.</li> </ul> </li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Ford <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Problem: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Brink of bankruptcy and lost 25% of market share .</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Management not working collaboratively - too aggressive and cutthroat.</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Solution: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Regular meetings where several levels of execs shared updates on their units. <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Met daily when at peak of crisis.</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Asked leaders to use color coded system (red/yellow/green) to assess overall company performance and their initiatives. It was quick and had a holistic view. <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> At first it was all green as leaders afraid to show vulnerability to which CEO would push, &quot;we lost billions last year and you are telling me there are no problems?&quot;</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Eventually a few brave leaders began speaking up and he praised them for their transparency.</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Fostered personal accountability when managers had to explain problems and headway.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Launched &quot;One Ford&quot; to break up silos and give global view - added global heads of each major area.</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> End result: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Leaders realized being more collaborative and honest allowed them to work together and find solutions faster.</li> </ul> </li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Novartis pharmaceuticals <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Problem: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Merger of 2 competing pharmaceutical companies to create this.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Moved from prescription drug based to diversified portfolio of health care products which was much more complex.</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Solution: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Lead the change with a clear purpose at the top.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Set clear vision and objectives.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Set clear expectations for employees. <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Must be flexible, accountable and act in the customers&#39; interests.</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Set clear metrics for gauging performance and ensuring quality across all areas. <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Good performance management system would help keep employees focused on the right things.</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Make it clear what won&#39;t be tolerated. <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Bribing, bad stories internally.</li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Since collaboration and alignment can&#39;t be forced, decentralize decision making to empower people to do what&#39;s best for their areas. <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Let&#39;s teams move faster and think/act more creatively.</li> </ul> </li> </ul> </li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> End Result: <ul style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em; list-style-position: outside;"> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> Employees became much more customer-centric and performance-minded.</li> <li style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; line-height: 1.42857em;"> CEO realized that with each org change made, company&#39;s culture was starting to match the vision he&#39;d outlined early on.</li> </ul> </li> </ul> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> http://www.zapposinsights.com/blog/item/article-key-learnings-culture-is-not-the-culprit http://www.zapposinsights.com/blog/item/article-key-learnings-culture-is-not-the-culprit Thu, 05 May 2016 23:40:26 GMT Pursuing Growth & Learning. How Zappos does it and how we can help you, too. <p class="date"> 04/21/2016 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script type="text/javascript" src="//ws.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "cec80d9a-458b-434f-a39f-c0b9f446c13e", doNotHash: false, doNotCopy: false, hashAddressBar: false});</script> <div class="socialBar"> <span class='st_facebook_hcount' displayText='Facebook'></span> <span class='st_twitter_hcount' displayText='Tweet'></span> <span class='st_linkedin_hcount' displayText='LinkedIn'></span> <span class='st_googleplus_hcount' displayText='Google +'></span> </div><div class="summary"> <p> &ldquo;Pursue Growth and Learning&rdquo; is one of our 10 Core Values here at Zappos.com. We made the decision to frame our Core Values as actionable statements to help us all remember that the intent with Core Values should NOT just be to use them as a marketing tool or to hand them out to new hires on their first day. Nope, in order for Core Values to work, you&rsquo;ve got to LIVE and COMMIT to them.</p> </div> <div class="html clearfix clear"> <style type="text/css"> .quote{ padding-left: 50px; paddding-right: 50px; }</style> <p> <img alt="" src="http://www.zapposinsights.com/files/accounts/zappos/assets/images/CV5-learn-grow-scaled.png" style="width: 200px; height: 300px; float: right; margin: 15px;" /></p> <p> Beyond them being actionable, we also have our Core Values incorporated in our Zappos Oath of Employment, which all New Hires review and sign when they join the company. With each value, we have a few paragraphs from Tony Hsieh that explain what we mean by the value along with a few questions for each employee to ask themselves, to help guide them in living the value.</p> <p> Here&rsquo;s what Tony had to say about &ldquo;Pursue Growth &amp; Learning:&rdquo;</p> <div class="quote"> <p> <em>At Zappos, we think it&#39;s important for employees to grow both personally and professionally. It&#39;s important to constantly challenge and stretch yourself, and not be stuck in a job where you don&#39;t feel like you are growing or learning. We believe that inside every employee is more potential than even the employee himself/herself realizes. Our goal is to help employees unlock that potential. But it has to be a joint effort: You have to want to challenge and stretch yourself in order for it to happen.</em></p> <p> <em>If you&#39;ve been at Zappos for more than a few months, one thing is clear: Zappos is growing. We grow because we take on new challenges, and we face even more new challenges because we&#39;re growing. It&#39;s an endless cycle, and it&#39;s a good thing: it&#39;s the only way for a company to survive. But it can also at times feel risky, stressful, and confusing. Sometimes it may seem that new problems crop up as fast as we solve the old ones (sometimes faster!), but that just means that we&#39;re moving -- that we&#39;re getting better and stronger. Anyone who wants to compete with us has to learn the same things, so problems are just mile markers. Each one we pass means we&#39;ve gotten better. Yet no matter how much better we get, we&#39;ll always have hard work to do, we&#39;ll never be done, and we&#39;ll never &quot;get it right.&quot; That may seem negative, but it&#39;s not: we&#39;ll do our best to &quot;get it right,&quot; and then do it again when we find out that things have changed. That is the cycle of growth, and like it or not, that cycle won&#39;t stop. It&#39;s hard... but if we weren&#39;t doing something hard, then we&#39;d have no business. The only reason we aren&#39;t swamped by our competition is because what we do is hard, and we do it better than anyone else. If it ever gets too easy, start looking for a tidal wave of competition to wash us away.</em></p> <p> <em>It may seem sometimes like we don&#39;t know what we&#39;re doing. And it&#39;s true: we don&#39;t. &nbsp;That&#39;s a bit scary, but you can take comfort in knowing that nobody else knows how to do what we&#39;re doing either. If they did, they&#39;d be the web&#39;s most popular shoe store. Sure, people have done parts of what we do before, but what we&#39;ve learned over the years at Zappos is that the devil is in the details. And that&#39;s where we&#39;re breaking new ground. So there are no experts in what we&#39;re doing. Except for us: we are becoming experts as we do this. And for anyone we bring on board, the best expertise they can bring is expertise at learning and adapting and figuring new things out -- helping the company grow, and in the process they will also be growing themselves.</em></p> <p> <em>Ask yourself:</em></p> <p> <em>How do you grow personally? How do you grow professionally? Are you a better person today than you were yesterday? How do you get your fellow circle members to grow personally? How do you get your fellow circle members to grow professionally? How do you challenge and stretch yourself? &nbsp;Are you learning something every day? What is your vision for where you want to go? How do you get the company as a whole to grow? Are you doing everything you can to promote company growth, and at the same time are you helping others understand the growth? Do you understand the company purpose? Do you understand the purpose of your circle?</em></p> </div> <p> (It&rsquo;s interesting to note that though this document was written in 2006 when we launched our Core Values, it is just as central and meaningful to Zappos today.)</p> <p> Ok, so that&rsquo;s how we think about growth and learning at Zappos! Here&rsquo;s where we&rsquo;d like to maybe help you grow and learn too&hellip;</p> <p> Many interesting articles are emailed and shared around the Zappos campus. &nbsp;Some contain valuable information for our own personal development; others are focused on culture, business, or organizational structure. Bet you also get articles about your industry or business sent your way or subscribe to some great online publications to help you stay current and to grow and learn. Unfortunately, all too often, given the volume of many of our inboxes, these go unopened or are quickly skimmed and deleted to clear the way for the next wave of messages.&nbsp;</p> <p> While we can&rsquo;t clean out your inbox for you, we can and are creating a new blog series to highlight key learnings from some of our favorite articles making the rounds at Zappos in the hopes of saving you some time, maybe inspiring some action, and helping you in your pursuit of growth and learning. &nbsp;;)</p> <p> Stay tuned for our first post which will be coming out next week.</p> </div> <p class="date"> 04/21/2016 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script type="text/javascript" src="//ws.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "cec80d9a-458b-434f-a39f-c0b9f446c13e", doNotHash: false, doNotCopy: false, hashAddressBar: false});</script> <div class="socialBar"> <span class='st_facebook_hcount' displayText='Facebook'></span> <span class='st_twitter_hcount' displayText='Tweet'></span> <span class='st_linkedin_hcount' displayText='LinkedIn'></span> <span class='st_googleplus_hcount' displayText='Google +'></span> </div><div class="summary"> <p> &ldquo;Pursue Growth and Learning&rdquo; is one of our 10 Core Values here at Zappos.com. We made the decision to frame our Core Values as actionable statements to help us all remember that the intent with Core Values should NOT just be to use them as a marketing tool or to hand them out to new hires on their first day. Nope, in order for Core Values to work, you&rsquo;ve got to LIVE and COMMIT to them.</p> </div> <div class="html clearfix clear"> <style type="text/css"> .quote{ padding-left: 50px; paddding-right: 50px; }</style> <p> <img alt="" src="http://www.zapposinsights.com/files/accounts/zappos/assets/images/CV5-learn-grow-scaled.png" style="width: 200px; height: 300px; float: right; margin: 15px;" /></p> <p> Beyond them being actionable, we also have our Core Values incorporated in our Zappos Oath of Employment, which all New Hires review and sign when they join the company. With each value, we have a few paragraphs from Tony Hsieh that explain what we mean by the value along with a few questions for each employee to ask themselves, to help guide them in living the value.</p> <p> Here&rsquo;s what Tony had to say about &ldquo;Pursue Growth &amp; Learning:&rdquo;</p> <div class="quote"> <p> <em>At Zappos, we think it&#39;s important for employees to grow both personally and professionally. It&#39;s important to constantly challenge and stretch yourself, and not be stuck in a job where you don&#39;t feel like you are growing or learning. We believe that inside every employee is more potential than even the employee himself/herself realizes. Our goal is to help employees unlock that potential. But it has to be a joint effort: You have to want to challenge and stretch yourself in order for it to happen.</em></p> <p> <em>If you&#39;ve been at Zappos for more than a few months, one thing is clear: Zappos is growing. We grow because we take on new challenges, and we face even more new challenges because we&#39;re growing. It&#39;s an endless cycle, and it&#39;s a good thing: it&#39;s the only way for a company to survive. But it can also at times feel risky, stressful, and confusing. Sometimes it may seem that new problems crop up as fast as we solve the old ones (sometimes faster!), but that just means that we&#39;re moving -- that we&#39;re getting better and stronger. Anyone who wants to compete with us has to learn the same things, so problems are just mile markers. Each one we pass means we&#39;ve gotten better. Yet no matter how much better we get, we&#39;ll always have hard work to do, we&#39;ll never be done, and we&#39;ll never &quot;get it right.&quot; That may seem negative, but it&#39;s not: we&#39;ll do our best to &quot;get it right,&quot; and then do it again when we find out that things have changed. That is the cycle of growth, and like it or not, that cycle won&#39;t stop. It&#39;s hard... but if we weren&#39;t doing something hard, then we&#39;d have no business. The only reason we aren&#39;t swamped by our competition is because what we do is hard, and we do it better than anyone else. If it ever gets too easy, start looking for a tidal wave of competition to wash us away.</em></p> <p> <em>It may seem sometimes like we don&#39;t know what we&#39;re doing. And it&#39;s true: we don&#39;t. &nbsp;That&#39;s a bit scary, but you can take comfort in knowing that nobody else knows how to do what we&#39;re doing either. If they did, they&#39;d be the web&#39;s most popular shoe store. Sure, people have done parts of what we do before, but what we&#39;ve learned over the years at Zappos is that the devil is in the details. And that&#39;s where we&#39;re breaking new ground. So there are no experts in what we&#39;re doing. Except for us: we are becoming experts as we do this. And for anyone we bring on board, the best expertise they can bring is expertise at learning and adapting and figuring new things out -- helping the company grow, and in the process they will also be growing themselves.</em></p> <p> <em>Ask yourself:</em></p> <p> <em>How do you grow personally? How do you grow professionally? Are you a better person today than you were yesterday? How do you get your fellow circle members to grow personally? How do you get your fellow circle members to grow professionally? How do you challenge and stretch yourself? &nbsp;Are you learning something every day? What is your vision for where you want to go? How do you get the company as a whole to grow? Are you doing everything you can to promote company growth, and at the same time are you helping others understand the growth? Do you understand the company purpose? Do you understand the purpose of your circle?</em></p> </div> <p> (It&rsquo;s interesting to note that though this document was written in 2006 when we launched our Core Values, it is just as central and meaningful to Zappos today.)</p> <p> Ok, so that&rsquo;s how we think about growth and learning at Zappos! Here&rsquo;s where we&rsquo;d like to maybe help you grow and learn too&hellip;</p> <p> Many interesting articles are emailed and shared around the Zappos campus. &nbsp;Some contain valuable information for our own personal development; others are focused on culture, business, or organizational structure. Bet you also get articles about your industry or business sent your way or subscribe to some great online publications to help you stay current and to grow and learn. Unfortunately, all too often, given the volume of many of our inboxes, these go unopened or are quickly skimmed and deleted to clear the way for the next wave of messages.&nbsp;</p> <p> While we can&rsquo;t clean out your inbox for you, we can and are creating a new blog series to highlight key learnings from some of our favorite articles making the rounds at Zappos in the hopes of saving you some time, maybe inspiring some action, and helping you in your pursuit of growth and learning. &nbsp;;)</p> <p> Stay tuned for our first post which will be coming out next week.</p> </div> http://www.zapposinsights.com/blog/item/pursuing-growth-learning-how-zappos-does-it-and-how-we-can-help-you-too http://www.zapposinsights.com/blog/item/pursuing-growth-learning-how-zappos-does-it-and-how-we-can-help-you-too Thu, 21 Apr 2016 23:44:44 GMT Grief Sucks...Helping a coworker deal with loss <p class="date"> 01/13/2016 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script type="text/javascript" src="//ws.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "cec80d9a-458b-434f-a39f-c0b9f446c13e", doNotHash: false, doNotCopy: false, hashAddressBar: false});</script> <div class="socialBar"> <span class='st_facebook_hcount' displayText='Facebook'></span> <span class='st_twitter_hcount' displayText='Tweet'></span> <span class='st_linkedin_hcount' displayText='LinkedIn'></span> <span class='st_googleplus_hcount' displayText='Google +'></span> </div><div class="summary"> <style type="text/css"> .blog-post li{ font-size: 1.7em; margin-left: 25px; list-style-type: disc; }</style> <p> The sad and sticky workplace scenario: a coworker is dealing with a personal loss and you are struggling with how best to help them. What do you do? Should you jump in and somehow show support or is the best approach to do and say nothing, for fear of doing the wrong thing? Perhaps they just &ldquo;need their space&rdquo; or you may be concerned that it is too personal an issue for the office.</p> </div> <div class="html clearfix clear"> <p> <img alt="" class="img-thumbnail img-responsive" src="http://www.zapposinsights.com/files/accounts/zappos/assets/images/grief_picture.jpg" style="width: 224px; height: 300px; float: right; margin: 10px;" /></p> <p> In my article &lsquo;Your Work Family; The Art of Choosing Wisely&rdquo;,</p> <p> <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/your-work-family-art-choosing-wisely-tammy-williams?trk=prof-post">https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/your-work-family-art-choosing-wisely-tammy-williams?trk=prof-post</a></p> <p> I shared my experience following my own tragedy of deep, personal loss and my subsequent observations about past and present employers and their unyielding support. While I am not an expert on grief, it is my hope that the following experiences that I had may help you, should you ever find yourself in the presence of a grieving coworker.</p> <ul> <li> Be sensitive to what your coworker needs. Grief is a process, unique and unpredictable and everyone will movethrough it in their own time and manner. You can help by being supportive with whatever way they find themselves needing to grieve. If they want to talk about their loved one, let them. If they don&rsquo;t, don&rsquo;t push them.</li> </ul> <ul> <li> If they want to dive into their work, don&rsquo;t question their readiness, (notwithstanding matters of safety) since the predictable distraction of project work may be their way of coping.</li> </ul> <ul> <li> The employee will almost certainly, eventually, recognize that they need rest and sleep and to you, they may even seem inflexible because of their insistence on routine. Do your best to support their &lsquo;new normal&rsquo; as they might find solace in gaining back some control over an otherwise uncontrollable circumstance.</li> </ul> <ul> <li> Small or large tokens of reassurance and support have been a big part of my healing. From a wall of flowers at the funeral home to donations to a preferred charity to sticky notes on my computer, my &lsquo;work family&rsquo; has shown me daily that I am in their thoughts.</li> </ul> <p> Finally, just say SOMETHING. Even an embrace with &ldquo;there are no words&rdquo;, or &ldquo;I don&rsquo;t know what to say&rdquo; was fine. By their attempt, their presence and their willingness to be vulnerable, they spoke volumes to me about how much they cared.</p> </div> <p class="date"> 01/13/2016 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script type="text/javascript" src="//ws.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "cec80d9a-458b-434f-a39f-c0b9f446c13e", doNotHash: false, doNotCopy: false, hashAddressBar: false});</script> <div class="socialBar"> <span class='st_facebook_hcount' displayText='Facebook'></span> <span class='st_twitter_hcount' displayText='Tweet'></span> <span class='st_linkedin_hcount' displayText='LinkedIn'></span> <span class='st_googleplus_hcount' displayText='Google +'></span> </div><div class="summary"> <style type="text/css"> .blog-post li{ font-size: 1.7em; margin-left: 25px; list-style-type: disc; }</style> <p> The sad and sticky workplace scenario: a coworker is dealing with a personal loss and you are struggling with how best to help them. What do you do? Should you jump in and somehow show support or is the best approach to do and say nothing, for fear of doing the wrong thing? Perhaps they just &ldquo;need their space&rdquo; or you may be concerned that it is too personal an issue for the office.</p> </div> <div class="html clearfix clear"> <p> <img alt="" class="img-thumbnail img-responsive" src="http://www.zapposinsights.com/files/accounts/zappos/assets/images/grief_picture.jpg" style="width: 224px; height: 300px; float: right; margin: 10px;" /></p> <p> In my article &lsquo;Your Work Family; The Art of Choosing Wisely&rdquo;,</p> <p> <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/your-work-family-art-choosing-wisely-tammy-williams?trk=prof-post">https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/your-work-family-art-choosing-wisely-tammy-williams?trk=prof-post</a></p> <p> I shared my experience following my own tragedy of deep, personal loss and my subsequent observations about past and present employers and their unyielding support. While I am not an expert on grief, it is my hope that the following experiences that I had may help you, should you ever find yourself in the presence of a grieving coworker.</p> <ul> <li> Be sensitive to what your coworker needs. Grief is a process, unique and unpredictable and everyone will movethrough it in their own time and manner. You can help by being supportive with whatever way they find themselves needing to grieve. If they want to talk about their loved one, let them. If they don&rsquo;t, don&rsquo;t push them.</li> </ul> <ul> <li> If they want to dive into their work, don&rsquo;t question their readiness, (notwithstanding matters of safety) since the predictable distraction of project work may be their way of coping.</li> </ul> <ul> <li> The employee will almost certainly, eventually, recognize that they need rest and sleep and to you, they may even seem inflexible because of their insistence on routine. Do your best to support their &lsquo;new normal&rsquo; as they might find solace in gaining back some control over an otherwise uncontrollable circumstance.</li> </ul> <ul> <li> Small or large tokens of reassurance and support have been a big part of my healing. From a wall of flowers at the funeral home to donations to a preferred charity to sticky notes on my computer, my &lsquo;work family&rsquo; has shown me daily that I am in their thoughts.</li> </ul> <p> Finally, just say SOMETHING. Even an embrace with &ldquo;there are no words&rdquo;, or &ldquo;I don&rsquo;t know what to say&rdquo; was fine. By their attempt, their presence and their willingness to be vulnerable, they spoke volumes to me about how much they cared.</p> </div> http://www.zapposinsights.com/blog/item/grief-suckshelping-a-coworker-deal-with-loss http://www.zapposinsights.com/blog/item/grief-suckshelping-a-coworker-deal-with-loss Wed, 13 Jan 2016 19:02:00 GMT How to Be Acquired by a BIG Company and Retain Your Culture <p class="date"> 12/08/2015 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script type="text/javascript" src="//ws.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "cec80d9a-458b-434f-a39f-c0b9f446c13e", doNotHash: false, doNotCopy: false, hashAddressBar: false});</script> <div class="socialBar"> <span class='st_facebook_hcount' displayText='Facebook'></span> <span class='st_twitter_hcount' displayText='Tweet'></span> <span class='st_linkedin_hcount' displayText='LinkedIn'></span> <span class='st_googleplus_hcount' displayText='Google +'></span> </div><div class="summary"> <p> It began like any other sweltering hot July day in Las Vegas, but this wasn&rsquo;t just any old day. There was change a-comin&rsquo;. Big news! Yep, on July 22,2009, Amazon.com acquired Zappos.com. (Insert loud, scary &ldquo;duh, duh, duh!!!&rdquo; music here.) OR as our CEO Tony Hsieh referred to the dealio in an email to the company: &ldquo;Zappos and Amazon sitting in a tree&hellip;&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> </div> <div class="html clearfix clear"> <style type="text/css"> p { margin-top: 20px; }</style> <p> That&rsquo;s how the story of Amazon acquiring Zappos started, and from the moment of the public announcement right up until today, there has been rampant speculation about what the acquisition would mean for the company culture and WOW service that Zappos is known for. Would Amazon simply take over Zappos? Would Zappos&rsquo; focus on delivering WOW service go away?&nbsp;</p> <p> <img alt="" class="img-responsive img-thumbnail" src="http://www.zapposinsights.com/files/accounts/zappos/assets/images/amazon-buys-zappos.jpg" style="width: 300px; height: 180px; float: right; margin: 10px;" /></p> <p> What about the Zappos culture?! Would Amazon change Zappos?</p> <p> Well folks, it&rsquo;s been over 6 years and I am pleased to report the Zappos culture and focus on service are alive and well! How did we do it? By making sure the conversation about maintaining our identity and culture was at the forefront at the acquisition table. As Tony shared with employees on the day we got hitched to Amazon:</p> <div style="margin-left: 50px;"> <p> <em>We plan to continue to run Zappos the way we have always run Zappos -- continuing to do what we believe is best for our brand, our culture, and our business. From a practical point of view, it will be as if we are switching out our current shareholders and board of directors for a new one, even though the technical legal structure may be different.</em></p> <p> <em>We are excited about doing this for 3 main reasons:</em></p> <p> <em>1) &nbsp;We think that there is a huge opportunity for us to really accelerate the growth of the Zappos brand and culture, and we believe that Amazon is the best partner to help us get there faster.</em></p> <p> <em>2) &nbsp;Amazon supports us in continuing to grow our vision as an independent entity, under the Zappos brand and with our unique culture.</em></p> <p> <em>3) &nbsp;We want to align ourselves with a shareholder and partner that thinks really long term (like we do at Zappos), as well as do what&rsquo;s in the best interest of our existing shareholders and investors.</em></p> <p> <em>Source: <a href="http://blogs.zappos.com/ceoletter">http://blogs.zappos.com/ceoletter</a></em></p> </div> <p> Remaining independent and maintaining our brand and culture was a top priority during negotiations. Beyond that, we also worked together jointly with Amazon to establish tenets by which we would manage our relationship. Here&rsquo;s the full document:</p> <div style="margin-left: 50px;"> <p> <em>Since announcing the transaction, Amazon and Zappos have worked on establishing the tenets by which we will manage our relationship. These five tenets will guide how we will work together:</em></p> <p> 1. &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;<em>&nbsp;Zappos will operate independently, overseen by a management committee that will function similar to the prior Zappos board of directors. The committee will initially be made up of 3 people from Amazon and 3 people from Zappos.</em></p> <p> <em>2. &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Zappos&#39; unique culture has been core to its success to date, and we look to protect it.</em></p> <p> 3. &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;<em>There will be differences between the customer experiences on Amazon and Zappos, and we will maintain separation so customers understand these differences.</em></p> <p> 4. &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;<em>Amazon wants to learn from Zappos and vice versa. We will share information back and forth to facilitate learning.</em></p> <p> 5. &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;<em>The only integration &#39;must-haves&#39; are processes legally necessary (for example, there are disclosure restrictions due to Amazon being a public company). These will be clearly defined and communicated.</em></p> <p> <em>We believe that these tenets embody the spirit of allowing Zappos to continue to build its business, brand, and culture and allowing Amazon to derive the maximum value from the transaction. In addition, just like Zappos core values, we will refer to these tenets as first principles for making decisions on how we will work together, what we will integrate, and what we wish to remain separate.</em></p> </div> <p> So how do you get acquired by a big company and maintain your culture? Make sure it&rsquo;s part of the conversation from the beginning! Be open, honest, and up front about the importance of your company culture and set it as a deal breaker in the negotiations. And once the relationship is finalized, keep the lines of communication open and have clear expectations around how you and your parent company will work together.</p> <p> After all, doesn&rsquo;t everyone want their story to end with <em>and they lived happily ever after</em>?</p> </div> <p class="date"> 12/08/2015 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <script type="text/javascript">var switchTo5x=true;</script> <script type="text/javascript" src="//ws.sharethis.com/button/buttons.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript">stLight.options({publisher: "cec80d9a-458b-434f-a39f-c0b9f446c13e", doNotHash: false, doNotCopy: false, hashAddressBar: false});</script> <div class="socialBar"> <span class='st_facebook_hcount' displayText='Facebook'></span> <span class='st_twitter_hcount' displayText='Tweet'></span> <span class='st_linkedin_hcount' displayText='LinkedIn'></span> <span class='st_googleplus_hcount' displayText='Google +'></span> </div><div class="summary"> <p> It began like any other sweltering hot July day in Las Vegas, but this wasn&rsquo;t just any old day. There was change a-comin&rsquo;. Big news! Yep, on July 22,2009, Amazon.com acquired Zappos.com. (Insert loud, scary &ldquo;duh, duh, duh!!!&rdquo; music here.) OR as our CEO Tony Hsieh referred to the dealio in an email to the company: &ldquo;Zappos and Amazon sitting in a tree&hellip;&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> </div> <div class="html clearfix clear"> <style type="text/css"> p { margin-top: 20px; }</style> <p> That&rsquo;s how the story of Amazon acquiring Zappos started, and from the moment of the public announcement right up until today, there has been rampant speculation about what the acquisition would mean for the company culture and WOW service that Zappos is known for. Would Amazon simply take over Zappos? Would Zappos&rsquo; focus on delivering WOW service go away?&nbsp;</p> <p> <img alt="" class="img-responsive img-thumbnail" src="http://www.zapposinsights.com/files/accounts/zappos/assets/images/amazon-buys-zappos.jpg" style="width: 300px; height: 180px; float: right; margin: 10px;" /></p> <p> What about the Zappos culture?! Would Amazon change Zappos?</p> <p> Well folks, it&rsquo;s been over 6 years and I am pleased to report the Zappos culture and focus on service are alive and well! How did we do it? By making sure the conversation about maintaining our identity and culture was at the forefront at the acquisition table. As Tony shared with employees on the day we got hitched to Amazon:</p> <div style="margin-left: 50px;"> <p> <em>We plan to continue to run Zappos the way we have always run Zappos -- continuing to do what we believe is best for our brand, our culture, and our business. From a practical point of view, it will be as if we are switching out our current shareholders and board of directors for a new one, even though the technical legal structure may be different.</em></p> <p> <em>We are excited about doing this for 3 main reasons:</em></p> <p> <em>1) &nbsp;We think that there is a huge opportunity for us to really accelerate the growth of the Zappos brand and culture, and we believe that Amazon is the best partner to help us get there faster.</em></p> <p> <em>2) &nbsp;Amazon supports us in continuing to grow our vision as an independent entity, under the Zappos brand and with our unique culture.</em></p> <p> <em>3) &nbsp;We want to align ourselves with a shareholder and partner that thinks really long term (like we do at Zappos), as well as do what&rsquo;s in the best interest of our existing shareholders and investors.</em></p> <p> <em>Source: <a href="http://blogs.zappos.com/ceoletter">http://blogs.zappos.com/ceoletter</a></em></p> </div> <p> Remaining independent and maintaining our brand and culture was a top priority during negotiations. Beyond that, we also worked together jointly with Amazon to establish tenets by which we would manage our relationship. Here&rsquo;s the full document:</p> <div style="margin-left: 50px;"> <p> <em>Since announcing the transaction, Amazon and Zappos have worked on establishing the tenets by which we will manage our relationship. These five tenets will guide how we will work together:</em></p> <p> 1. &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;<em>&nbsp;Zappos will operate independently, overseen by a management committee that will function similar to the prior Zappos board of directors. The committee will initially be made up of 3 people from Amazon and 3 people from Zappos.</em></p> <p> <em>2. &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Zappos&#39; unique culture has been core to its success to date, and we look to protect it.</em></p> <p> 3. &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;<em>There will be differences between the customer experiences on Amazon and Zappos, and we will maintain separation so customers understand these differences.</em></p> <p> 4. &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;<em>Amazon wants to learn from Zappos and vice versa. We will share information back and forth to facilitate learning.</em></p> <p> 5. &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;<em>The only integration &#39;must-haves&#39; are processes legally necessary (for example, there are disclosure restrictions due to Amazon being a public company). These will be clearly defined and communicated.</em></p> <p> <em>We believe that these tenets embody the spirit of allowing Zappos to continue to build its business, brand, and culture and allowing Amazon to derive the maximum value from the transaction. In addition, just like Zappos core values, we will refer to these tenets as first principles for making decisions on how we will work together, what we will integrate, and what we wish to remain separate.</em></p> </div> <p> So how do you get acquired by a big company and maintain your culture? Make sure it&rsquo;s part of the conversation from the beginning! Be open, honest, and up front about the importance of your company culture and set it as a deal breaker in the negotiations. And once the relationship is finalized, keep the lines of communication open and have clear expectations around how you and your parent company will work together.</p> <p> After all, doesn&rsquo;t everyone want their story to end with <em>and they lived happily ever after</em>?</p> </div> http://www.zapposinsights.com/blog/item/how-to-be-acquired-by-a-big-company-and-retain-your-culture http://www.zapposinsights.com/blog/item/how-to-be-acquired-by-a-big-company-and-retain-your-culture Tue, 08 Dec 2015 05:00:00 GMT